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Mark III - bolt release lever or slingshot release?

This is a discussion on Mark III - bolt release lever or slingshot release? within the Ruger Rimfires forums, part of the Pistol & Revolver Forum category; Originally Posted by agksimon You have to take your support hand off the gun to load a magazine. Why not slingshot the bolt, before you ...


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Old July 31st, 2019, 10:05 AM   #16
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agksimon View Post
You have to take your support hand off the gun to load a magazine. Why not slingshot the bolt, before you re-acquire your two-handed grip.
I guess everyone has their little habits. I seem to want to only charge the weapon after I am ready to fire, and so doing that when in my stance came naturally. I did it the slingshot way for a long time, with my MKII, but developed a new habit with the MKIII.

I take everone's advice and appreciate it. I can see the wear issue, I'll strongly consider that.



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Old July 31st, 2019, 10:56 AM   #17
 
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The wear issue is a real thing. But it's less of an issue with the MKIII/MKIV models. The bolt design was modified at the stop to be tapered instead of squared like it was on earlier models. That change should create less wear.
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Old July 31st, 2019, 11:03 AM   #18
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The "wear issue" isn't caused by friction when the bolt stop is moved to release the bolt, it is caused by peening when the bolt tries to thrust forward and is abruptly stopped by the bolt stop. No amount of oil or grease will prevent peening. In other words, you will see exactly the same wear on the bolt and bolt stop with or without using the slingshot technique and with or without oil/grease.
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Old July 31st, 2019, 12:57 PM   #19
 
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I do either the bolt stop or the pull back method. Both work well. No detectable wear that can be attributed to the method.

Don't obsess over a very small thing//
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Old July 31st, 2019, 06:39 PM   #20
 
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Originally Posted by Iowegan View Post
The "wear issue" isn't caused by friction when the bolt stop is moved to release the bolt, it is caused by peening when the bolt tries to thrust forward and is abruptly stopped by the bolt stop. No amount of oil or grease will prevent peening. In other words, you will see exactly the same wear on the bolt and bolt stop with or without using the slingshot technique and with or without oil/grease.
Yes you called it right on.
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Old August 1st, 2019, 05:58 AM   #21
 
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Agree with sling shot method,Ruger customer service agrees also,my bolt and bolt stop *** were peened and they said it was due to using bolt stop lever to release bolt instead of slingshot method

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Old August 1st, 2019, 06:52 AM   #22
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I think it's funny how Ruger hires people for customer services that are not qualified gunsmiths yet they give out bogus information and because they are in an "official" position, customers tend to believe them. It's very easy to determine normal wear from peening.
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Old August 1st, 2019, 09:07 AM   #23
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubba68 View Post
Hate to go against everybody's advice but I have always used the bolt stop lever to release the bolt on all of my MK pistols and have never had an issue with any of them. Have put 5000 rounds plus through the MK 11's and at least 3000 plus through the MK IV and no problem with it.

Worse case is maybe wear the end of the lever to the point where it would not stop the bolt. If that happens put a new lever in and keep on going.
Mee Too !

I been swimming against the current since 1969 , Stamdard , MKI Target and MKII Target . Nothing has ever been damaged by it and it's an easy fix if it does. Too old to change now...
Being the heretic that I am I also drop the slide on my 1911's like that .

The DI at Fort Polk did it that way...and in boot camp you did it his way , no questions asked .
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Old August 1st, 2019, 06:35 PM   #24
 
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The only reason I slingshot my pistols is because I'm left-handed. My trigger finger was not engineered in a manner to facilitate an easy release of the bolt stop.

If I were concerned about wearing out the bolt stop, I would order another one to have on standby in the event the installed one began to fail.
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Old August 2nd, 2019, 07:11 PM   #25
 
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MC-5C,
You are wise to want to release the slide "the right way". But fact is, BOTH ways are acceptable. As was pointed out earlier, if they didn't want you to use the bolt stop/slide release, they wouldn't have made it with a ledge for you to push it down with your thumb. You aren't 'hurting' anything using it.

The whole 'slingshot' idea is to get in 'good habits' for when you have to run a 'tap/rack/bang' drill. If you are in the habit of 'racking the slide' (slingshot) then you will do that in the heat of the moment as that's what your muscle memory will know.

For what it is worth, I've been using the "safety" to release the bolt on my Mark I since the 1980s. That gun has to have nearly 8,000 rounds through it now. (On the Mark I's, the safety WAS/IS the bolt stop/bolt release!) The gun still works fine. No harm has been done.

But I'm trying to get 'in the habit' of slingshot-ing the slide these days so I do the same thing with ALL my guns. Why? Some of my centerfire pistols are so stiff, I can't release the slide with the slide stop/slide release lever! If I was using them in anger, I want to be in the habit of releasing the slide by slingshot-ing, so I'm doing that more and more with my Ruger Mark I and Mark IV (22/45). But I didn't switched because what I was doing was wrong or bad for the gun. So do what works for you and don't sweat it.
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Old August 2nd, 2019, 08:00 PM   #26
 
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Why not just shoot 11 rounds and drop your magazine, and insert another with ten rounds, and continue shooting etc. etc.. BTW while in the USMC, (1911 .45ACP) we would load with one in the chamber, and seven in the magazine, after shooting seven rounds we would drop the magazine and insert another magazine loaded with 7 rounds, etc. etc.. When I went on to the Police Department we did the same procedure in order to eliminate the time it took to drop the slide into firing position and regain your grip. Just a habit of counting the number of shots I fired, although I know the time saved may be insignificant, but then again it may not.
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Old August 3rd, 2019, 12:47 PM   #27
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Loose Noose, Something you may not know ….. most pistols (including all MK series pistols) are intended to be loaded with the bolt or slide locked back …. 10 round capacity max. This allows the magazine to seat very easily without having to palm smack the base of the magazine. If your magazine is fully loaded with 10 rounds and you insert it in the pistol with the bolt forward, you can damage the top few cartridges in the magazine and you may damage the magazine lips or latch and/or the latch in the gun itself. Damaged cartridges often result in a failure to feed plus don't forget …. 22 LRs are rimfire so if you smack the base of the magazine hard enough, you can actually cause the top cartridge to go bang!

1911 - 7 round magazines are an exception because they were actually designed for 8 rounds. The 7 round 1911 magazines have a longer leg on the follower so you can't quite get 8 rounds in it but there is enough room to seat a fully loaded mag without damaging the top cartridge or the magazine latch. By using a follower with a shorter leg, you can convert a 7 rounder into an 8 rounder but the total capacity of the 1911 is still 8 rounds because there isn't enough free space in the magazine to compress the column of cartridges with the slide forward.
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Old August 6th, 2019, 10:16 PM   #28
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MC-5C View Post
Stainless steel MK III Target. Somewhere I got the idea that it was "good practice" to release the bolt by pulling back on the bolt and releasing it ("sling-shotting"), after inserting a fresh magazine. Then after a while I started using the bolt release lever on the side, since it falls very naturally under my left hand thumb in my firing stance and two-handed grip. I find I like it better at the range because I don't have to take my left hand off the weapon to grasp and release the slide, I keep my stance intact and I acquire a good target picture more readily.

What are the pro's and con's of using the bolt release lever instead of sling-shotting the bolt? If it matters I have the Volquartsen Volthane target grip and their matching bolt release lever.

Thanks, Brian
I have the only reason I can think of for why I slingshot instead of using the bolt stop. I have osteo-arthritis and it is particularly bad in my thumbs. I cannot release it without pain and so I modified my mkIII with the kane-wolf slingshot mod and a halo ring. Problem solved for me. Used it however is comfortable for you. Parts are not that expensive to replace even if you do break them.
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Old August 7th, 2019, 07:28 PM   #29
 
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Folks, it I simple matter of reducing friction. If slingshot causes the bolt lock to be pushed down by spring action then that causes less friction than pulling the lever down and increasing friction in the release lever pivot pin and lever's face.

--ninjago
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Old August 8th, 2019, 01:50 AM   #30
 
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Rugernijago,
Welcome to the forum. Will love to hear your comments in the future.

When the Ruger Mark IV came out I asked this question because I did not see it in the owners manual and wondered if they changed something in the Mark IV.

I had several comments on my post and on my new Mark IV 22/45 Tactical the release was so hard to move by thumb that I had to sling shot it. But I took the stop out and polished it and changed the angle just a bit and it now operates really well and I don't sling shot it any longer. Main reason is because a well respected Gunsmith that is on these sights, made the comment that it was no big deal to use the release. If it ever wears out they are cheap and easily replaceable. Kind of hit a home run in my mind. So I do use the sling shot method in my Marks I use the release in my 22/45 to see if it really does hurt anything. Which I do not believe it will. Plus I prefer to use the release.

So do as you would want or what makes you feel better. It's all good in my opinion.
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