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Ruger Security Six - How to improve DA trigger?

This is a discussion on Ruger Security Six - How to improve DA trigger? within the Ruger Double Action forums, part of the Pistol & Revolver Forum category; The hammer dog is the interface between the trigger and hammer during the first half or so of the DA trigger pull. If removed I ...


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Old March 25th, 2020, 03:07 PM   #16
 
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The hammer dog is the interface between the trigger and hammer during the first half or so of the DA trigger pull. If removed I have never tried this but probably the lower shelf as seen in the video would lift the hammer part way. Both the length of the hammer dog from pivot point to contact surface with the trigger shelf and the shape will impact the quality of the trigger pull for the first half. At one time I had a Ruger (don't recall if Six Series or SP) that had a hitch in the handoff so ordered a couple of extra hammer dogs from Numrich:

https://www.gunpartscorp.com/products/222790

Switched a few around in the gun much like an assembler in a gun factory would do until got a smooth transition. I have also seen mentioned on this forum that the lower shelf might be polished or have a very slight amount of material removed to get a smooth transition. Here is a string mentioning that:

https://rugerforum.net/gunsmithing/1...0-trigger.html

There is another string with a photo or two showing where to polish/hone but I cannot find it right now. Ah, here it is:

https://rugerforum.net/ruger-double-...e-threads.html

Go down to the comment by Exlogger.

As to polishing I would avoid the Dremel. On the trigger shelf I use a fine Arkansas stone sparingly and then wrap it with crocus cloth to get a final polish that leaves the surface flat. I would not stone the hammer dog. Just give a light polish but try to keep true to a 90 degree angle to crocus cloth (or very fine sandpaper) backed by a flat surface.



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Old March 25th, 2020, 05:50 PM   #17
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rover View Post
The hammer dog is the interface between the trigger and hammer during the first half or so of the DA trigger pull. If removed I have never tried this but probably the lower shelf as seen in the video would lift the hammer part way. Both the length of the hammer dog from pivot point to contact surface with the trigger shelf and the shape will impact the quality of the trigger pull for the first half. At one time I had a Ruger (don't recall if Six Series or SP) that had a hitch in the handoff so ordered a couple of extra hammer dogs from Numrich:

https://www.gunpartscorp.com/products/222790

Switched a few around in the gun much like an assembler in a gun factory would do until got a smooth transition. I have also seen mentioned on this forum that the lower shelf might be polished or have a very slight amount of material removed to get a smooth transition. Here is a string mentioning that:

https://rugerforum.net/gunsmithing/1...0-trigger.html

There is another string with a photo or two showing where to polish/hone but I cannot find it right now. Ah, here it is:

https://rugerforum.net/ruger-double-...e-threads.html

Go down to the comment by Exlogger.

As to polishing I would avoid the Dremel. On the trigger shelf I use a fine Arkansas stone sparingly and then wrap it with crocus cloth to get a final polish that leaves the surface flat. I would not stone the hammer dog. Just give a light polish but try to keep true to a 90 degree angle to crocus cloth (or very fine sandpaper) backed by a flat surface.
These seem like excellent ideas. Just ordered some spare hammer dogs, a set of Arkansas stones, and an assortment of very fine automotive sandpaper. Should have all the necessary materials by early next week.
My plan is to start with hammer dog swapping, then move on to polishing the hammer dog, then move on to stoning/polishing the trigger shelf. I’ll check the trigger pull between each one of these steps and only do what is necessary...although I might do a light polish to the hammer dog and trigger shelf even if it’s not strictly necessary (we’ll see how confident im feeling!).
Thanks @Rover for your help and I’ll be sure to update this thread with my results!
By the way: the funny thing about all this is that I’m feeling somewhat conflicted about improving the trigger on this gun, because I’m sure that the last few days of dry firing its heavy and uneven DA trigger has vastly improved my trigger control! Part of me wants to keep it as-is and just designate this as my “trigger control workout revolver” 😉.
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Old April 1st, 2020, 08:22 AM   #18
 
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OP update:
I tried all the things that @Rover suggested: I stoned and polished the trigger shelf, lightly polished the hammer dog, lightly polished the lower trigger shelf, and stoned/polished the entire mainspring strut. I also tried dropping in a difference hammer dog which didn’t make any difference. The trigger pull has gotten quite a bit smoother and a bit lighter overall as a result, but it still has the pronounced “hump” in the same place! Again: the hump starts just after the cylinder begins to rotate, and seems to dissipate right before the cylinder locks.

I might try to stone the trigger shelf a bit more aggressively: I started off using an ultra-fine Arkansas stone, so I’ll try a fine stone this time and see if that makes any difference. Any other ideas?

Last edited by taters613; April 1st, 2020 at 08:25 AM.
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Old April 1st, 2020, 09:23 PM   #19
 
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By the way, perhaps this is a hint: there’s some strange marks showing up on the bottom of the hammer on the surface underneath the single action sear. My suspicion is that this surface is contacting the lower trigger shelf. I say “showing up” because I polished these marks off, reassembled the gun, dry fire a dozen times, and saw that they had returned! I’ve attached a picture to this thread showing what I’m talking about.
What do you think? Do these marks indicate a normal contact point, or is it abnormal?
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Old April 1st, 2020, 11:54 PM   #20
 
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WOOOOO-HOOOO!!! I FIGURED IT OUT!!!
Sorry for the outburst, but this was my first attempt at a home trigger job and it was a total success!!
Basically it was the exact same problem that was described in the thread that @Rover provided a link to (here: https://rugerforum.net/ruger-double-...e-threads.html). After my previous post, I performed a more aggressive filing of the double action trigger sear (or the “lower shelf” of the trigger) by wrapping some 1000 grit sand paper around a butter knife and sliding it between the upper shelf and the lower shelf. After reassembling the revolver, I immediately noticed a slight but definite reduction in the “hump” I described! I performed four iterations of the same process (disassembly, sanding, reassembling, dry firing), and by the end, the hump in the DA pull was barely perceptible! I decided to leave it at that, since I have actually started to like the slight hump in the trigger pull (also I was starting to worry that I was pushing my luck). I did one final disassembly and polished all surfaces with 2000 grit sand paper and then reassembled. The DA trigger pull is now AMAZING, and I appreciate it even more because I feel like I was able to “tune” it to exactly my preferences through this iterative process. The tiny hump actually makes it easier to stage the trigger (which I like to do for precision shots), but I can also effortlessly “pull straight through”. Also, the polishing of the hammer dog and upper trigger shelf seems to have made the DA pull even smoother (Although I did also polished just about every mating surface I could find!).
I came up with an interesting idea that helped me visualize the exact engagement of the trigger and hammer during the DA cycle. It’s hard to describe, but I included a picture below show it. Basically, you can attach the hammer to the OUTSIDE of the frame by using the hammer pivot pin, and then push the trigger assembly up against the bottom of the frame, but with the right side edge of the trigger assembly against the left edge of the frame. The end result is that the trigger and hammer are in the same relative positions as they would be inside the revolver, but they are plainly visible. With a little practice, you can actually operate the DA trigger pull with the parts on the outside of the gun. This experiment is actually what convinced me to file the DA trigger sear, as I could clearly see that it was engaging too early in the cycle! I’ve also included a few other pictures showing some of my polishing work. Unfortunately I forgot to take close up pictures after I finished the final polishing of the DA sear and upper shelf of the trigger, but I was able to achieve an almost-mirror polish.
Thank you so much @Rover for all your help, and to everyone else who contributed. This was an extremely fun learning experience, and I’m very glad I went through with it. For anyone else experiencing a similar problem with their security six (or sp101 or Gp100), I would highly recommend trying out this solution. By the way: it’s worth noting that “factory new” hammers and triggers can be bought on Numrich at the moment for around $25, and hammer dogs for only $3 or so, which is part of the reason I chose to dive into this trigger job process right now. Might as well give it a shot when replacement parts are available and cheap!
Thanks again to everyone, and feel free to ask me any questions you have.
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Old April 2nd, 2020, 11:30 AM   #21
 
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Taters - glad it worked out. And I agree about Numrich being a good source of supply. I like having some extra parts on hand. On some such as my SP101 I keep both a spurred and a spurless hammer on hand so can switch depending upon circumstances. Numrich is especially useful for guns that no longer are supported by the manufacturer with parts.
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