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Sighting in a scope

This is a discussion on Sighting in a scope within the Ruger 10/22 Rimfire forums, part of the Rifle & Shotgun Forum category; I'm new to the .22 gun mine came with a simmons 3-9x32 scope..What do i need to do to get it sighted in? If someone ...


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Old November 13th, 2019, 12:18 PM   #1
 
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Sighting in a scope

I'm new to the .22 gun mine came with a simmons 3-9x32 scope..What do i need to do to get it sighted in? If someone is close to me and wants to help me that would be great or ill just do as you guys tell me and try it myself



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Old November 13th, 2019, 01:23 PM   #2
 
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First a few basics. Is the scope mounted? If so, make sure it is mounted in a position that will allow you to shoot the rifle in the manner you intend. As an example, if you plan to shoot from a prone position, the scope will usually need to be mounted considerably farther forward to allow for proper eye relief without any vignetting of the visual field than if you simply plan to shoot standing and off the bench. If you zero your scope and then find you need to move it forward or back, expect to have to re-zero it.

Make sure that your rings are tight on the rail and the scope tube. A scope that is loose on the rail or in the rings will be impossible to zero. Find out how your particular scope adjusts windage and elevation. Most scopes have turrets that produce audible and tactile "clicks" as they are turned although some have only infinite friction adjustments. Assuming yours has "clicks" make sure that you know how much each click will shift the point of impact (POI). The turrets usually have a scale with an arrow that indicates which way to turn the turret to adjust the POI marked "up" or "U" and "R" for right. The up (or down) and right (or left) refers to which way the POI will move. In other words, if your initial shots on target are hitting low and left of your point of aim (POA) you want to move the POI up and right so you move the turrets in that direction.

Most scopes will indicate how much movement in your POI to expect for each click in terms of minutes of angle (MOA). Lets say your scope adjusts in 1/4 MOA per click which is very common. One minute of angle will move the POI 1/4" at 25 yards, 1/2" at 50 yards, 1" at 100 yards, etc. So if you are zeroing at 25 yards and you need to move your groups 1" right, if you have a scope with 1/4 MOA adjustments, you will need to turn the windage turret 16 clicks in the direction of the "R" arrow. The windage turret of nearly all scopes (all I have used) will be on the right side of the scope tube, and the elevation turret on the top.

Next, decide what range you want to zero the scope for. There will typically be a near zero and a far zero. The zero will be affected by the type of ammunition you shoot, and the mounting height of the scope (the distance of the sight axis above the bore axis). For example, if your mounting height (vertical distance from the center of scope tube to the center of your barrel bore) is 1.875" and you are shooting standard velocity 40 grain round nose ammunition, for a far zero of 50 yards your near zero will be in the neighborhood of 21-22 yards. So your scope will be zeroed at two different ranges. The path of the bullet will rise above the sight axis by less than 1/2" between those two ranges, and start to drop below the sight axis past 50 yards.

Once you have decided what range you want to zero at, there are many different schemes on how to go about it. I have never bothered with laser bore sighters and the like. 22lr ammunition is pretty cheap and I have found that I can get a scope zeroed pretty quickly with a dozen rounds or so. What I do is use a ballistic calculator to determine what the expected point of impact would be at a very short range given a zero at my desired range. You input the type of ammunition you are using and your scope mounting height, your desired zero range, and the range at which you intend to start zeroing at. Starting to rough zero at a very short range will guarantee that you are "on paper".

So lets say I have a mounting height of 1.875" and I am shooting 40 grain round nose, standard velocity ammunition. I want to zero at 50 yards. I start by hanging a target at a "can't miss" range, say 7 yards. My ballistic calculator tells me that I will hit 1" low at 7 yards for a 50 yard zero. The target can just be a clean (no holes) piece of cardboard backer with a 1" circle or pasty placed near the center. Aim at the circle and shoot a couple of rounds. If the two holes are close you can go ahead and make an adjustment off of them. If not, shoot a few more rounds and determine the center of the group. You want to make adjustments to move the holes to a position 1" directly below the target circle. Do so, then shoot another couple of rounds and continue until your POI is 1" below your POA.

At that point you can fine tune the zero by moving out to 25 yards at which range your POI should be a bullet hole diameter or less below your POA. Finally confirm zero and fine tune at your intended far zero point of 50 yards.

Keep in mind that the muzzle velocity of your ammunition in your rifle under your ambient conditions may not exactly match that assumed by a ballistic calculator. And 22lr projectiles are very significantly affected by strong cross winds. Also, the shift in POI per click of your scope turret adjustments may not be exactly what the manufacturer says. And if you change ammunition, expect your POI to change. But if you have your scope pretty well zeroed for one type of 22lr ammunition, re-zeroing for a different variety of 22lr ammo should be pretty easy.

Last edited by pblanc; November 13th, 2019 at 01:45 PM.
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Old November 13th, 2019, 01:36 PM   #3
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I'd go and shoot it before you start turning screws. If the guy had the scope on the rifle for a while chances are it's sighted in.
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Old November 13th, 2019, 01:40 PM   #4
 
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Thanks for sharing this sighting of a scope information pblanc.
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Old November 13th, 2019, 01:59 PM   #5
 
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I'm not planning to scope mine -- going to stay with irons for now (Tech Sights are coming soon) -- but that's great information and interesting to read any way. I think Pblanc's instructional treatise's are great. So nice for a forum like this when you want detailed directions written clearly. (In part, I write about technical for a living -- in my case, science mostly -- and know the importance of it.) He wrote something similar for me about iron sites recently -- specifically about the AR sights that the Tech Sights are based on. Great stuff.
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Old November 13th, 2019, 03:05 PM   #6
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I answered this in your "I got it" thread. Pblanc provided a more detailed explanation of the process in this thread.
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Old November 13th, 2019, 04:02 PM   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pblanc View Post
First a few basics. Is the scope mounted? If so, make sure it is mounted in a position that will allow you to shoot the rifle in the manner you intend. As an example, if you plan to shoot from a prone position, the scope will usually need to be mounted considerably farther forward to allow for proper eye relief without any vignetting of the visual field than if you simply plan to shoot standing and off the bench. If you zero your scope and then find you need to move it forward or back, expect to have to re-zero it.

Make sure that your rings are tight on the rail and the scope tube. A scope that is loose on the rail or in the rings will be impossible to zero. Find out how your particular scope adjusts windage and elevation. Most scopes have turrets that produce audible and tactile "clicks" as they are turned although some have only infinite friction adjustments. Assuming yours has "clicks" make sure that you know how much each click will shift the point of impact (POI). The turrets usually have a scale with an arrow that indicates which way to turn the turret to adjust the POI marked "up" or "U" and "R" for right. The up (or down) and right (or left) refers to which way the POI will move. In other words, if your initial shots on target are hitting low and left of your point of aim (POA) you want to move the POI up and right so you move the turrets in that direction.

Most scopes will indicate how much movement in your POI to expect for each click in terms of minutes of angle (MOA). Lets say your scope adjusts in 1/4 MOA per click which is very common. One minute of angle will move the POI 1/4" at 25 yards, 1/2" at 50 yards, 1" at 100 yards, etc. So if you are zeroing at 25 yards and you need to move your groups 1" right, if you have a scope with 1/4 MOA adjustments, you will need to turn the windage turret 16 clicks in the direction of the "R" arrow. The windage turret of nearly all scopes (all I have used) will be on the right side of the scope tube, and the elevation turret on the top.

Next, decide what range you want to zero the scope for. There will typically be a near zero and a far zero. The zero will be affected by the type of ammunition you shoot, and the mounting height of the scope (the distance of the sight axis above the bore axis). For example, if your mounting height (vertical distance from the center of scope tube to the center of your barrel bore) is 1.875" and you are shooting standard velocity 40 grain round nose ammunition, for a far zero of 50 yards your near zero will be in the neighborhood of 21-22 yards. So your scope will be zeroed at two different ranges. The path of the bullet will rise above the sight axis by less than 1/2" between those two ranges, and start to drop below the sight axis past 50 yards.

Once you have decided what range you want to zero at, there are many different schemes on how to go about it. I have never bothered with laser bore sighters and the like. 22lr ammunition is pretty cheap and I have found that I can get a scope zeroed pretty quickly with a dozen rounds or so. What I do is use a ballistic calculator to determine what the expected point of impact would be at a very short range given a zero at my desired range. You input the type of ammunition you are using and your scope mounting height, your desired zero range, and the range at which you intend to start zeroing at. Starting to rough zero at a very short range will guarantee that you are "on paper".

So lets say I have a mounting height of 1.875" and I am shooting 40 grain round nose, standard velocity ammunition. I want to zero at 50 yards. I start by hanging a target at a "can't miss" range, say 7 yards. My ballistic calculator tells me that I will hit 1" low at 7 yards for a 50 yard zero. The target can just be a clean (no holes) piece of cardboard backer with a 1" circle or pasty placed near the center. Aim at the circle and shoot a couple of rounds. If the two holes are close you can go ahead and make an adjustment off of them. If not, shoot a few more rounds and determine the center of the group. You want to make adjustments to move the holes to a position 1" directly below the target circle. Do so, then shoot another couple of rounds and continue until your POI is 1" below your POA.

At that point you can fine tune the zero by moving out to 25 yards at which range your POI should be a bullet hole diameter or less below your POA. Finally confirm zero and fine tune at your intended far zero point of 50 yards.

Keep in mind that the muzzle velocity of your ammunition in your rifle under your ambient conditions may not exactly match that assumed by a ballistic calculator. And 22lr projectiles are very significantly affected by strong cross winds. Also, the shift in POI per click of your scope turret adjustments may not be exactly what the manufacturer says. And if you change ammunition, expect your POI to change. But if you have your scope pretty well zeroed for one type of 22lr ammunition, re-zeroing for a different variety of 22lr ammo should be pretty easy.
Thanks for this information i have emailed it to me so i can use it as a guide if i need it...the guy brought it like 10 years ago so I'm hoping its all set to go..It will make it easy on me then
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Old November 13th, 2019, 06:29 PM   #8
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ifithitu View Post
Thanks for sharing this sighting of a scope information pblanc.
You said it. Great advice.
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Old November 14th, 2019, 04:41 AM   #9
 
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that Simmons scope isn't too bad for its price range - i have one on my 10/22 TD... it has stayed zeroed after several removals and re-attachments...

i was skeptical about laser bore sight kits, but now i'm convinced that one can save some time and get very close to zero at 25yds - i use mine for scopes and red dots on Ruger rifles and pistols and it works very well... a $20 kit will save you time and some ammo at the range

enjoy your 10/22 - it's a lot of fun!

willie
on the Gulf of Mexico
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Old December 16th, 2019, 12:55 AM   #10
 
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I have spent many hours mounting and zeroing scopes on various guns before I got a laser bore sighter. I have a couple of them but the easiest and cheapest is one I bought at Sporsmans Whse. It's spud is tapered and uses little plastic adapters on a scre on the eid to center and snug the laser. Don't manhandle it and if yoru muzzle is not nicked or something it works great. Came with a small grid to be mounted on a wall etc and adjust the scope or sights until the cross hairs are centered on where the laser is focused.
Supposed to zero the scope for .22sat 50 yards I don't have tables in hand but find the new 30 grIN VERY HIGH VELOCITY AND THE 40 grain very high velocity ammo to be better sighted in a 75 yards or even 100 yards. I don't generally shoot at anythin gover 75 yards with the.22s.
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