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.22/45 dry fire question

This is a discussion on .22/45 dry fire question within the Ruger Rimfires forums, part of the Pistol & Revolver Forum category; I just picked up a 22/45 today at a gun show. About to break it down now, but I ws a little confused about dry ...


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Old July 2nd, 2011, 01:10 PM   #1
 
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.22/45 dry fire question

I just picked up a 22/45 today at a gun show. About to break it down now, but I ws a little confused about dry firing information. I always heard you can damage a .22 by dry firing. The book says there is a fire pin block which allows you to dry fire, but seems you have to disassemble it to get to it, yet the instructions to take the gun apart says you have to pull the trigger to uncock it. I'm a little confused as to what can hurt the gun by dry firing and what can't. Can someone give me some clarification on this? Is it that as long as the firing pin stop is in place, I can dry fire, but never do it when it's out? If so, why would it be out? I assume I can expect it to be in place from the factory, so does this mean I can dry fire it right now out of the box?




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Old July 2nd, 2011, 01:17 PM   #2
 
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dry fire is generally a bad idea on any rimfire gun because the pin strikes the face when no brass is there to act as cushion, instead of pin being out in open air as on a center fire. But on a 22/45 you have no choice for stripping the gun, unless you use snap caps, which would be a hassle IMHO. I have read of people doing that, but the manual says to pull trigger during disassembly, so occasional dry fire must be OK.
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 01:26 PM   #3
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Here is what Ruger specifically states on the issue

Quote:
Q. Can I dry fire my Mark III pistol?
A. Yes. The Mark III has a firing pin stop that prevents the firing pin from contacting the rear of the barrel and damaging the edge of the chamber. If you are going to dry fire the pistol extensively, the stop pin and firing pin will eventually wear and contact could occur, and we recommend replacing both the firing pin and the firing pin stop from time to time. You should also monitor the contact of the firing pin with the rear of the barrel.
As a practical matter, unless you plan on doing thousands of dry fires you are not likely to wear out the firing pin stop to the point that the firing pin will make contact with the breach end of the barrel. I wouldn't worry about it ... just check it from time to time and replace it if/when it becomes an issue. My MKIII512 still has the original firing pin and firing pin stop at over 55,000 live rounds and at least a few hundred dry fires.
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 02:52 PM   #4
 
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Schweet, thanks for the comments guys. Now I can dig in!
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 03:22 PM   #5
 
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Originally Posted by Lethalchem View Post
Schweet, thanks for the comments guys. Now I can dig in!
Hey Lethal, Correct me if I am wrong but wasn't it you who said but a few weeks ago that you had no plans on getting a 22/45?
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 03:54 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by CdnInAz View Post
But on a 22/45 you have no choice for stripping the gun, unless you use snap caps, which would be a hassle IMHO. I have read of people doing that, but the manual says to pull trigger during disassembly, so occasional dry fire must be OK.
.22 LR snap caps exist? I've never seen them anywhere and .22 LR is the most common caliber on earth, so I gather virtually nobody uses them if they can find them.

The manual also tells you not to store the gun cocked and the only way to decock it is to pull the trigger. Would it theoretically be better to leave the hammer cocked than to dry fire it to uncock for storage?
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 04:01 PM   #7
 
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.22 LR snap caps exist? I've never seen them anywhere and .22 LR is the most common caliber on earth, so I gather virtually nobody uses them if they can find them.
yep, they do exist. I bought a few at a gun show back when was first teaching my son. Have not used in a long while. They are more dummy round then snap cap because there is not enough space inside for spring or anything. Here's a link to one example, similar to ones I have:
Tipton Snap Cap 22 Short and Long Rifle Polymer Package of 10 - MidwayUSA
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The manual also tells you not to store the gun cocked and the only way to decock it is to pull the trigger. Would it theoretically be better to leave the hammer cocked than to dry fire it to uncock for storage?
exactly, manual says to uncock for storage, and also says must drop hammer for disassembly. So I always concluded that some dry fire is OK per Ruger's instructions - as BuckJM wrote above it would take extreme counts of dry firing to damage. So I always dry fire to uncock when putting on hooks in safe.

Last edited by CdnInAz; July 2nd, 2011 at 04:03 PM.
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 04:05 PM   #8
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dry fire is generally a bad idea on any rimfire gun because the pin strikes the face when no brass is there to act as cushion, instead of pin being out in open air as on a center fire.
That brings up an issue I had been thinking about with regard to a .22 revolver. With a CF revolver I do my best to count the shots to avoid unintentionally dry firing it. I used to not count and would simply find it was empty when I got a "click" on #7.

A rimfire revolver could require me to learn to count as high as ten. It seems I'm not skilled enough to count that high, as I often find myself miscounting when I do so with my MKIII. Though it doesn't matter on a pistol as that bolt [or slide on other guns] staying open makes it obvious unlike a revolver that enjoys keeping lack of live ammo a secret.

I find it embarrasingly hard to count while focused on other stuff like hitting a target. One would think a college grad could count to 10.

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Old July 2nd, 2011, 04:10 PM   #9
 
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That brings up an issue I had been thinking about with regard to a .22 revolver. With a CF revolver I do my best to count the shots to avoid unintentionally dry firing it. I used to not count and would simply find it was empty when I got a "click" on #7.

A rimfire revolver could require me to learn to count as high as ten. It seems I'm not skilled enough to count that high, as I often find myself miscounting when I do so with my MKIII. Though it doesn't matter on a pistol as that bolt [or slide on other guns] staying open makes it obvious unlike a revolver that enjoys keeping lack of live ammo a secret.
However (and I also don't keep track of the count), in a revolver that last click is not a dry-fire, since the firing pin hits the rim of your first fired cartridge.
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 04:17 PM   #10
 
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Hey Lethal, Correct me if I am wrong but wasn't it you who said but a few weeks ago that you had no plans on getting a 22/45?
Yes, you are quite correct. See this thread for the whole, ugly, bloody story... lol.

First 22/45 Assembly expreience
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 04:18 PM   #11
 
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However (and I also don't keep track of the count), in a revolver that last click is not a dry-fire, since the firing pin hits the rim of your first fired cartridge.
Yeah, I agree. That wouldn't be the same as a dry fire, I wouldn't think. I imagine that wouldn't be hurting anything.
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 04:21 PM   #12
 
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While Ruger does say in the manual packaged with their rimfire pistols that it's OK to dryfire, they also admonish against excessive dry firing. What does excessive mean, who knows. I've been using #4/#6 plastic wall anchors as "snap-caps" in all my .22 rimfire pistols for several years now. In case you don't know what wall anchors are, they're the plastic, cone shaped gizmos, with a slight shoulder you stick in wallboard after you drill a hole so you can hang "gramma's" picture up in the living room. A box of 100 plastic wall anchors run around $5.00 at your local hardware store and can be used around 10 times for each one to dampen the firing pin hit and prevent ANY chamber mouth damage. A Mark pistol extractor will even pull the thing out of the chamber and there's no fear of it rusting when stored in the chamber. Better to be safe than sorry, and they do come in handy while dry fire practicing with revolvers or pistols.

Last edited by D A Wood; July 2nd, 2011 at 04:24 PM.
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 04:33 PM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by D A Wood View Post
While Ruger does say in the manual packaged with their rimfire pistols that it's OK to dryfire, they also admonish against excessive dry firing. What does excessive mean, who knows. I've been using #4/#6 plastic wall anchors as "snap-caps" in all my .22 rimfire pistols for several years now. In case you don't know what wall anchors are, they're the plastic, cone shaped gizmos, with a slight shoulder you stick in wallboard after you drill a hole so you can hang "gramma's" picture up in the living room. A box of 100 plastic wall anchors run around $5.00 at your local hardware store and can be used around 10 times for each one to dampen the firing pin hit and prevent ANY chamber mouth damage. A Mark pistol extractor will even pull the thing out of the chamber and there's no fear of it rusting when stored in the chamber. Better to be safe than sorry, and they do come in handy while dry fire practicing with revolvers or pistols.
Very immaginative, got any pics of it so I can understand exactly how it works?
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 04:41 PM   #14
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However (and I also don't keep track of the count), in a revolver that last click is not a dry-fire, since the firing pin hits the rim of your first fired cartridge.
Counting shots is a distracting pain in the butt IMO, which is why I didn't do it when I first started shooting a few years ago. I also didn't do it because I wasn't aware of any possible reason to do it.

I can see why Dirty Harry needs to know if he's ready to blow a punk's head "clean off" or if he's going to be killed by a punk when his hand cannon goes "click." That didn't seem to really matter when a paper target presents no threat.

Then a friend who's very much into guns pointed out to me that it would be best to count as to not put undue stress on a firing pin. We were specifically talking about CF revolvers, so I don't know what he'd say about rimfires. His feeling was that on a CF the firing pin hitting an already fired primer was much the same as hitting nothing as it's already dented in and thus not providing a cushion.

I'm not sure if an already fired .22 case would provide much cushion either for a firing pin. Would the fired case from round #1 likely rotate during subsequent shots such that they would be a good chance the firing pin would hit that rim in a different spot, thus providing the same cushioning effect as with a live round?

I was thinking about possibly buying a .22 revolver. Sadly, Ruger doesn't make any .22 DA revolvers. Seems like a S&W 617 would likely be my best option, though I'd much prefer if I could get the equivalent from Ruger.
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 04:55 PM   #15
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While Ruger does say in the manual packaged with their rimfire pistols that it's OK to dryfire, they also admonish against excessive dry firing.
I'll have to get out my MK III manual later and look at exatly what it says on that. I never noticed mention of that, but then one isn't at all likely to dry fire their Ruger rimfire pistol except as required for stripping & storage.

I know my GP100 manual says dry fire is just fine without limitation, though I'd still buy snap caps if I wanted to do so. One is obviously much more likely to dry fire a GP100 than an MK III. After all, the main point of dry firing is to get used to DA trigger control without the massive cost of many thousands of rounds of CF ammo. Well, an MK III removes the DA trigger issue and removes the high ammo cost, leaving little reason to dry fire it.
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