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Super Redhawk binding and other problems

This is a discussion on Super Redhawk binding and other problems within the Ruger Double Action forums, part of the Pistol & Revolver Forum category; Recently bought a Super Redhawk .44 with a 7.5' barrel. After about 35 rounds at the range the cylinder was not wanting to spin freely ...


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Old December 25th, 2012, 06:57 AM   #1
 
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Super Redhawk binding and other problems

Recently bought a Super Redhawk .44 with a 7.5' barrel.
After about 35 rounds at the range the cylinder was not wanting to spin freely anymore and had serious binding issues.. I was shooting Winchester S@W .44 Special rounds.
Also when i cleaned it the next day after, at the first inch of the barrel where it is by the cylinders is really rough and some metal flakes actually came out when i was using the brush.
This is my first revolver so i am kinda freaking out here and don't know what to do, try it again, call Ruger or what. Thanks for any info guys!



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Old December 25th, 2012, 07:48 AM   #2
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LurtzOfIsengard, Super Redhawks were not designed for lead bullets so it doesn't surprise me to see your post. There are several things you can do .... first, swing the cylinder open, push the ejector rod, then look under the ejector (AKA star wheel). Chances are some residue found its way in there and is binding up cylinder rotation. On a new gun, just a flake of powder is enough to bind it up.

Next, I would shoot a box or more of 44 Mag jacketed bullets. This will help smooth the bore and forcing cone where lead fouling is less likely to build up. In other words ... break it in with jacketed bullets before shooting lead.

Because SRHs are shipped optimized for jacketed bullets, there is a high probability your cylinder throats are too tight. They should measure .430~.4305" in diameter (factory normal is .429"). Factory forcing cones are cut to 5 degrees, which is too tight for any lead bullet. A competent gunsmith can ream the cylinder throats and chamfer the forcing cone to 11 degrees. This will give you optimum performance with lead bullets.

Finally, before lead bullets will shoot well without excessive fouling, the hardness of the bullet should match chamber pressure. Normally with factory ammo, this has already been done by the manufacturer, however it is not unusual to see a mismatch. Trying a different brand of ammo make help a lot.
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Old December 25th, 2012, 08:00 AM   #3
 
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Could be faulty timing on the gun, but, as Iowegan says, most likely dirt and crud from shooting under the ejector star. My GP-100 does the same thing as yours when debris, dirt and powder residue from shooting gets under the ejector star on the cylinder. This prevents the star from fully seating back down in the cylinder. This, in turn, pushes the ammo back against the face of the frame, causing the cylinder to hang up or get sluggish. Doesn't take much crud, either. Freaked me out the first time it happened, but now that I understand the problem, no big deal. Easy to fix.

I usually take a little cleaning brush with me at the range to clean under the star when needed. Also helps to point the barrel skyward when emptying the cylinder to minimize the amount of debris that might get under the star. What kind of ammo are you shooting? Shooting dirty ammo will require you to clean under the star more often.

When you get home from a range trip, be sure to clean, thoroughly under that star. It's an area that some DA revolver owners overlook.

Last edited by North country gal; December 25th, 2012 at 08:04 AM.
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Old December 25th, 2012, 09:20 AM   #4
 
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Could it be OAL of cartridge? Caused my GP-100 to lock up one time..
wPm
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Old December 25th, 2012, 11:21 AM   #5
 
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Iowegan, If the forcing cone is recut to 11 deg. will that have any effect on the accuracy or performance if jacketed bullets are used?
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Old December 25th, 2012, 12:42 PM   #6
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larry8,
Quote:
If the forcing cone is recut to 11 deg. will that have any effect on the accuracy or performance if jacketed bullets are used?
Accuracy will normally stay about the same ... maybe a slight improvement but I have never seen accuracy get worse with a jacketed bullet and 11 deg forcing cone. However, you will get a loss in velocity with jacketed bullets because they are typically .001" smaller than lead bullets. ... usually around 50 fps with a full magnum loads but with some gun and bullet combinations, it can be considerably more. There are other things that affect accuracy and velocity such as the B/C gap, cylinder to bore alignment, the diameter of the throats, and most of all .... the depth of the factory forcing cone.

Ruger uses a 5 degree forcing cone in all their revolvers. Some cones are barely cut deep enough to be called a cone whereas others can be quite deep. When you chamfer a 5 deg cone with an 11 deg cutter, you must make sure the fresh cut extends from the barrel face all the way to the lands. If you don't cut the 11 deg cone deep enough, you will end up with a "compound cut", meaning the rear part is 11 deg and the front part is 5 deg. A compound cut almost always results in poor accuracy and excessive bore fouling with lead bullets. The wider the forcing cone entry, the more pressure you will lose. So ... if you happen to get a revolver with a deep factory forcing cone, the entry to the barrel will be wider, thus more pressure loss.

My recommendations are .... if you are shooting lead bullets exclusively, then having the cylinder throats reamed to the proper diameter (bore diameter + .001~.0015) is essential. 11 deg forcing cones tend to work much better with all lead bullets but especially semi-wad cutters. The point being ... you can't optimize a revolver for both lead and jacketed bullets so pick the one you shoot the most and deal with the consequences when shooting the other type.

For 44 Mag revolvers, there is one exception that I am aware of. Typical 44 cal jacketed bullets are .429" in diameter but Hornady 44 cal jacketed bullets are .430". When shooting 44 cal Hornady bullets in a revolver optimized for .429" bullets, accuracy is seldom stellar, however, when using these bullets in a revolver optimized for lead bullets (.430~.4305 throats and an 11 deg forcing cone), velocity loss is minimal and accuracy is excellent.
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Old December 25th, 2012, 12:47 PM   #7
 
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After you break it in as suggested, try Magtec
cowboy action ammo, it has stopped the leading
issue for me. Both in .44 spl and 45 colt.
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Old December 25th, 2012, 04:40 PM   #8
 
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Quote:
and some metal flakes actually came out when i was using the brush.
By chance, was some of the ammo you were shooting have nickel plated cases? When shooting SASS. I had some 45 LC ammo in nickled cases and had the same thing happen during cleaning, but of course it was nickle from the cases, not part of the gun. Smithy.
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Old December 25th, 2012, 04:53 PM   #9
 
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May not be your problem, but you could check the B/C gap. I recently experienced the cylinder binding on a Security Six and found the B/C gap was .000. I added a couple endshake washer to fix the problem.
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Old December 25th, 2012, 06:16 PM   #10
 
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Thanks for the info guys. I was going by what the guy at bass pro told me to get as far as ammo went. Last time I ask advice from there. So getting the proper ammo should smooth out the bottom of the barrel?
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Old December 25th, 2012, 06:28 PM   #11
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North country gal View Post
Could be faulty timing on the gun, but, as Iowegan says, most likely dirt and crud from shooting under the ejector star. My GP-100 does the same thing as yours when debris, dirt and powder residue from shooting gets under the ejector star on the cylinder. This prevents the star from fully seating back down in the cylinder. This, in turn, pushes the ammo back against the face of the frame, causing the cylinder to hang up or get sluggish. Doesn't take much crud, either. Freaked me out the first time it happened, but now that I understand the problem, no big deal. Easy to fix.

I usually take a little cleaning brush with me at the range to clean under the star when needed. Also helps to point the barrel skyward when emptying the cylinder to minimize the amount of debris that might get under the star. What kind of ammo are you shooting? Shooting dirty ammo will require you to clean under the star more often.

When you get home from a range trip, be sure to clean, thoroughly under that star. It's an area that some DA revolver owners overlook.
What North Country Gal said is exactly what I was going to say.

I have the same thing happen with my Ruger Security Six 357 when I use "dirty" ammo.
Winchester White Box will jam up my gun in a little as 25 rounds.
I have bought other ammo that is much cleaner and the gun does not get so much carbon and unburnt powder residue.
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Old December 25th, 2012, 07:55 PM   #12
 
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And can someone reccomend a specific ammo and a good place to get it?
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