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SP101 trigger woes

This is a discussion on SP101 trigger woes within the Ruger Double Action forums, part of the Pistol & Revolver Forum category; Originally Posted by Hooksetter That's ok. You do you and I'll do me. Everyone has to learn how to do something at some point in ...


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Old March 12th, 2017, 09:46 PM   #46
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hooksetter View Post
That's ok. You do you and I'll do me. Everyone has to learn how to do something at some point in their lives. I made it a point to learn at an early age. The people I've always associated with have minds like I do. Between myself, and the very few people I call my friends, there has been nothing so far we couldn't fix, make better, or figure out it works.

A side note, the people who frequent this forum are very smart. Not me, but I gp have gotten a few tips from people on here who have guided me towards directions regarding my firearms that have saved me hundreds of dollars, just by doing a few simple little things.
You're entitled to that opinion, and I respect it. I personally believe that there's a few things that should be left to the pros. Too many people have seriously injured themselves doing a bubba job on a gun with a dremel tool just to save a few bucks. Same goes with a lot of things. For example, home repair. Too many people have put themselves out tens of thousands of dollars (in fixing what they messed up) trying to be clever or save a few bucks on a bubba home repair job (not to mention that the result often looks terrible).

Yes, there are folks who can learn these things themselves and do a pretty good job. But just ask a professional gunsmith if anybody should just grab a few stones and start working on their guns. The answer will be no. Same goes with any professional roofer, etc.

As for the smart folks on this forum, I am sure they are very smart, and I am sure I can learn a lot from them. But I also realize that this is the internet and anybody can write anything.



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Old March 13th, 2017, 07:11 AM   #47
 
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One problem with having a gunsmith doing an action job is finding a knowledgeable one familiar with double action revolvers, especially Rugers. Many look down their noses at Rugers as it is not a S&W or Colt. Second, action jobs can vary from little more than changing springs to polishing and honing, etc. Third, in some parts of the country even with large cities there are no gunsmiths that work on Ruger revolvers that do good work. Fourth, is seeing examples of the gunsmith's work or evaluations thereof. With the large, well known gunsmithing operations usually there are writeups in various gun magazines with pictures.

As an aside if I recall Hamilton Bowen was an English major in college but his shop is known for Ruger custom work. This gets to the problem of finding a "professional" gunsmith. Is the 'smith a graduate of a known gunsmith curriculum from college, did he learn on the job, what does he know. If I go to find a CPA I know at least he had a certain experience/education requirement and passed the CPA exam so he should know something.

Last edited by Rover; March 13th, 2017 at 07:19 AM.
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Old March 13th, 2017, 07:37 AM   #48
 
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I did my SP101 myself, it was very easy. No issues with it. But I have worked on Rugers and Smiths for a couple years. You have to have the right tools and patience.
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Old March 13th, 2017, 02:33 PM   #49
 
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Originally Posted by Rover View Post
One problem with having a gunsmith doing an action job is finding a knowledgeable one familiar with double action revolvers, especially Rugers. Many look down their noses at Rugers as it is not a S&W or Colt. Second, action jobs can vary from little more than changing springs to polishing and honing, etc. Third, in some parts of the country even with large cities there are no gunsmiths that work on Ruger revolvers that do good work. Fourth, is seeing examples of the gunsmith's work or evaluations thereof. With the large, well known gunsmithing operations usually there are writeups in various gun magazines with pictures.

As an aside if I recall Hamilton Bowen was an English major in college but his shop is known for Ruger custom work. This gets to the problem of finding a "professional" gunsmith. Is the 'smith a graduate of a known gunsmith curriculum from college, did he learn on the job, what does he know. If I go to find a CPA I know at least he had a certain experience/education requirement and passed the CPA exam so he should know something.
Interesting. I've been a history teacher the last 20 years of my life, but I guarantee I'm no Hamilton Bowen lol!!!!!!!!!!! I have roofed my own house before, I've built a house before, I've overhauled my own engines, painted and done bodywork in my own vehicles, dobpne my own plumbing, change my own light fixtures and ceiling fans, etc, without turning off the breaker ( I know it's dumb but I've never been shocked, yet). Remodeled rooms in the house, basement. I'm sorry, but I refuse to let others do for me what I can do for myself. I have never been afraid of screwing something up and I will not live my life with this kind of fear. There are far more important things to be afraid of, and mechanical, inanimate objects do not get a place on the list. This philosophy has done pretty well for a lot of years. Not being an "expert" in something is not going to keep me from doing it.

2nd note, I feel like I'm being baited and this is far from what I remember as the OP. The spring changes, and the smoothing of rough edges as found in the links on this thread work very well!!! 10# hammer spring, 8# trigger spring, runs like butter!!!
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Old March 19th, 2017, 07:52 AM   #50
 
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Originally Posted by Ironwil View Post
I have two Ruger revolvers - the SP101 and the Super Redhawk 44 mag. I love both guns, but it's a mystery to me why the SP101 has such a heavy trigger pull. The action on my 44 is much lighter and smoother, and my accuracy with it is unsurprisingly much higher. I understand that concealed carry guns, particularly those that are DAO, have heavier trigger pulls for safety, but the SP101 seems kind of extreme in this regard. I would think that a lighter pull would be preferred for self-defense applications, and leave safety to the user's common sense.

I've also read about trigger jobs to improve this, but my skills with guns only stretch to being a moderately good shot and cleaning them. I'm learning how to care for them in greater detail as fast as I can. I really like this gun - it's built like a tiny tank, and I've found that even with 357 mag rounds, the recoil isn't bad at all. I just want a much lighter trigger.


I had two new vaqueros at one time. One was a 357 the other was a 45. The 45 had a decent "normal" hammer cock, the 357 has a smooth as butter seemed like a custom gun hammer cock. I mean it felt so freaking nice and the trigger pull was like silk and it was dead nuts accurate ( I sold it BTW) Both of these came from the factory, no work was done at all after the purchase. My uncle purchased a vaquero in 45 last year and it was very stout to cock. So i guess it depends on who built your gun at the factory.


Really wish i kept that 357. I kick my self every day for selling. Some lucky SOB is shooting her now.
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Old March 19th, 2017, 08:24 AM   #51
 
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Taconator...I think you are exactly right about quality being tied to the person who did the factory work. It also shows up in other Ruger firearms, not just handguns. Overall, though, they are some fin guns.
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