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SP101 Crane Movement?

This is a discussion on SP101 Crane Movement? within the Ruger Double Action forums, part of the Pistol & Revolver Forum category; I have a new (200 rounds through it) 3" SP101. If I press the cylinder to the left (as if to open) without depressing the ...


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Old December 23rd, 2014, 05:25 PM   #1
 
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SP101 Crane Movement?

I have a new (200 rounds through it) 3" SP101. If I press the cylinder to the left (as if to open) without depressing the release latch, there is some movement (per my measurements around .005) of the crane away from the frame. Is this normal?



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Old December 23rd, 2014, 07:41 PM   #2
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rightwinger View Post
I have a new (200 rounds through it) 3" SP101. If I press the cylinder to the left (as if to open) without depressing the release latch, there is some movement (per my measurements around .005) of the crane away from the frame. Is this normal?
I'm not sure of .005 but yes there is naturally some movement. There has to be *some* play in a manufactured part.

For future reference: the movements to check is the cylinder's movement forward and back when cocked and it's rotational movement also when cocked.

Don't expect .000 unless you're ready to pay large $$$$. On normal production guns .000 never happens. After you've looked at a bunch of new, used and junk you'll just know by feel how much is good and what's bad.

Also check the 'bore to cylinder gap'.

Everything else is pretty meaningless.
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Old December 24th, 2014, 04:19 AM   #3
 
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That's about what I have on mine. There needs to be some clearance around the cylinder pin, and there needs to be enough clearance for the forward crane lock to move in and out of the recess in the frame. When you press the cylinder to the side, you're stacking those tolerances and taking all the play out of the system, so there will be some movement.

As long as the revolver is properly timed and is not leading or spitting lead, it will be fine.
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Old December 24th, 2014, 07:33 AM   #4
 
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Originally Posted by Spike12 View Post
I'm not sure of .005 but yes there is naturally some movement. There has to be *some* play in a manufactured part.

For future reference: the movements to check is the cylinder's movement forward and back when cocked and it's rotational movement also when cocked.

Don't expect .000 unless you're ready to pay large $$$$. On normal production guns .000 never happens. After you've looked at a bunch of new, used and junk you'll just know by feel how much is good and what's bad.

Also check the 'bore to cylinder gap'.

Everything else is pretty meaningless.
Thank you. Everything else that you reference checks out okay, (although the B/C gap is a little more than I like but still within spec) and it shoots great.
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Old December 24th, 2014, 07:34 AM   #5
 
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That's about what I have on mine. There needs to be some clearance around the cylinder pin, and there needs to be enough clearance for the forward crane lock to move in and out of the recess in the frame. When you press the cylinder to the side, you're stacking those tolerances and taking all the play out of the system, so there will be some movement.

As long as the revolver is properly timed and is not leading or spitting lead, it will be fine.
Thanks; it shoots great with no spitting lead.
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Old December 26th, 2014, 12:44 PM   #6
 
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At a LGS today and they had 4 new SP101's on the rack. I checked all of them for crane movement. Obviously, I could not measure them with feeler gauges.
2 appeared a little looser than mine, one was about the same, maybe slightly tighter, and 1 was with very little, if any, movement.
So, I would imagine that while mine is not what I like, it is likely within spec.
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Old December 26th, 2014, 07:11 PM   #7
 
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The good thing about the Ruger design is that this movement should stay the same and not increase. If this slight movement bothers you too much, and I know that sometimes things like this does bother me as I'm kind of particular, you can always give Ruger a call and see what they have to say.
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Old December 26th, 2014, 07:48 PM   #8
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rightwinger View Post
At a LGS today and they had 4 new SP101's on the rack. I checked all of them for crane movement. Obviously, I could not measure them with feeler gauges.
2 appeared a little looser than mine, one was about the same, maybe slightly tighter, and 1 was with very little, if any, movement.
So, I would imagine that while mine is not what I like, it is likely within spec.
How do you measure the play with feeler gauges?
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Old December 26th, 2014, 07:57 PM   #9
 
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Rightwinger I feel you have the right to be particular about your new SP101 they are very nice revolvers. What I just said just letting you know I am a Smith & Wesson fan. But when it comes to these J framed guns the Ruger SP101 to me stands out being the best gun. Yes they are heavier for the most part when compared to the J frames but they are over built to last! It sounds like that you have gone out to check out the cylinder play in other guns and thats not a bad thing to do if it helps rest your mind. I have owned 2 Ruger DA's guns in times past one the Ruger Security Six and the other a Ruger SP101. I like guns and sell & trade to some degree when I was thinking about a CCW revolver I compare 3 guns 2 of them S&W & 1 a Ruger LCRX I chose the Ruger. I have been wanting to get back to a nice 3 inch revolver for quite sometime. I was fortunate enough to find a nice used Ruger SP101 with a 3 inch barrel that was listed for $400.00 most of them I have seen in the $450 & up. This one is a .38 Special but the price was more in the range I could afford. Well I was able to work out a trade swap deal & I am very happy with my Ruger SP101 .38 Special. You will get several years of very good service out of your gun. I am not going to trade or sell this little gem its just to nice as I am certain your's is. Good Luck to you & thanks for sharing your story its things like this that we can learn from. From what I see you are a new member so if I haven't done it Welcome to the Ruger Forum!
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Old December 26th, 2014, 09:40 PM   #10
 
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If it works fine then I wouldn't worry about it, you want a little bit of play in a Ruger you use for defense...that way you know it will work when it's filthy, hot, dropped in mud, etc.

Think about this, AK's are built sloppy and the parts rattle when you shake the rifle but they work in pretty much any conditions. Ruger revolvers are kind of the same way, they have varying degrees of "slop" but when they are within spec they will last forever.
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Old December 27th, 2014, 06:22 AM   #11
 
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Originally Posted by fixitfred View Post
How do you measure the play with feeler gauges?
First and foremost, I made sure the revolver was completely unloaded.
Then I took a feeler gauge that would fit between the crane and the frame with the crane to frame joint as tight as possible by pushing from the left. Then I pushed on the cylinder from the right and found a feeler gauge that would fit, and then I subtracted the dimensions of the 2 feeler gauges to come up with the total.

It was the only way I could think of; except, using plasti gauge; but I don't have any plasti gauge. If anyone has a better idea for a more accurate measure, please let me know.
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Old December 27th, 2014, 06:28 AM   #12
 
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Thanks wproct, gqucool, and ExArmy11b for the words of encouragement. I think I may call Ruger on Monday to see if they will tell me the tolerances.
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Old December 27th, 2014, 07:37 AM   #13
 
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This is a fairly commonly misunderstood issue by folks that don't understand the design.

That "play" is not necessarily about the Ruger manufacturing process, it's more about the Ruger design.

The SP/GP/SRH/RH revolvers all have a ball detent on the trigger guard assy that locks the cylinder crane assy into the cylinder frame. Since that's a round ball detent locking into a round indention and held in place with a spring, there will always be the opportunity to force the cylinder forward slightly in that way. For most of these models, if you push rather hard, they'll open up a LOT more than 0.005".

The reality is that it's a non-critical tolerance in that condition. As long as it locks in solid when it's closed, a little play when open doesn't affect anything at all, and complaining about it is nothing more than that - complaining.
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Old December 27th, 2014, 07:47 AM   #14
 
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Originally Posted by Varminterror View Post
This is a fairly commonly misunderstood issue by folks that don't understand the design.

That "play" is not necessarily about the Ruger manufacturing process, it's more about the Ruger design.

The SP/GP/SRH/RH revolvers all have a ball detent on the trigger guard assy that locks the cylinder crane assy into the cylinder frame. Since that's a round ball detent locking into a round indention and held in place with a spring, there will always be the opportunity to force the cylinder forward slightly in that way. For most of these models, if you push rather hard, they'll open up a LOT more than 0.005".

The reality is that it's a non-critical tolerance in that condition. As long as it locks in solid when it's closed, a little play when open doesn't affect anything at all, and complaining about it is nothing more than that - complaining.
I hope that I didn't come across as "complaining". I was just trying to understand whether this is an issue. Also, you reference forward motion. That is not what I am referencing. It is side to side motion, not the rotational movement of the cylinder, of the joint where the crane meets the frame.
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Old December 27th, 2014, 07:54 AM   #15
 
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Originally Posted by Rightwinger View Post
First and foremost, I made sure the revolver was completely unloaded.
Then I took a feeler gauge that would fit between the crane and the frame with the crane to frame joint as tight as possible by pushing from the left. Then I pushed on the cylinder from the right and found a feeler gauge that would fit, and then I subtracted the dimensions of the 2 feeler gauges to come up with the total.

It was the only way I could think of; except, using plasti gauge; but I don't have any plasti gauge. If anyone has a better idea for a more accurate measure, please let me know.
I'm still not sure how you measured it or how you have that much play but that's not important. New out of the box everything should be right. You did say you compared a few others and it was comparable so that should be 'nuff said. Forcing the cylinder to one side then another is not a force normally associated with a revolver in normal operation.

You may want to invest in a range rod.

In case anyone doesn't know you should never flick your wrist to close the cylinder. Do it enough times and you'll find out what kind of play you can introduce to your cylinder alignment.
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