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Lead RN vs Copper Plated RN

This is a discussion on Lead RN vs Copper Plated RN within the Ruger 10/22 Rimfire forums, part of the Rifle & Shotgun Forum category; Not an issue for me in any of the five 22s we shoot. I use standard velocity bulk lead in a couple of our target ...


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Old March 7th, 2012, 07:29 AM   #16
 
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Not an issue for me in any of the five 22s we shoot. I use standard velocity bulk lead in a couple of our target 22s and CCI Mini Mags copper plated in the others. Leading is just not an issue, either way. The cheap stuff does burn dirtier, though, but it takes a lot of gunk buildup to really cause problems in a 22. Just go with the load you and/or your gun likes and have fun.



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Old March 7th, 2012, 10:23 AM   #17
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The only time I've noticed a differance is when I use the M261 bolt in my AR15. Afterwards the gas tube is plugged if I use plated ammo.
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Old March 7th, 2012, 11:27 AM   #18
 
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If I shoot LRN out of my revolvers I make sure to shoot some FMJ before leaving,It reduces a lot of the fouling in the barrel and cyclinder,just a tip !
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Old March 7th, 2012, 06:22 PM   #19
 
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Thanks for all the additional information and responses.

I've been thinking about this subject since I started it and I'm starting to make some conclusions but I still have a lot more shooting to do before I make any rash decisions.

But this is what I'm thinking...
The Federal 36g CPHP bulk is the cheapest and easiest to get because Walmart has them. They also perform well for me with very few failures per +/-500 rounds.

I like the CCI LRN a fraction better, almost zero failures and equally as accurate as the Federal. But these are not readily available to me, only online with shipping costs. Occasionally I find deals that get them to about the Federal price.

I'm actually not liking the CCI Mini Mag. Contrary to what most people here say, I'm not seeing stellar performance and these rounds actually seem very dirty to me. At least they're leaving a lot more powder residue than the others.

So, with all that in mind I'm thinking the Federal CPHP bulk is the best deal for me considering price, availability and performance in my rifle.
I'm not a serious shooter, hunter or competitor. I'm more a casual plinker so I think the Federal might be the way to go.

But, as I stated I'm not going to rush into a final decision.
I think that means I need to get some more ammo tomorrow and continue the testing.

Thanks again for all the input.
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Old March 7th, 2012, 06:40 PM   #20
 
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When I shoot lead bullets I just keep it down to about 800 f.p.s. They shoot a little dirty but I always clean my guns as soon as I get back to the house anyway.
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Old March 7th, 2012, 06:42 PM   #21
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAC V View Post
When I shoot lead bullets I just keep it down to about 800 f.p.s. They shoot a little dirty but I always clean my guns as soon as I get back to the house anyway.
Now just why the hell do I need to push 1 for ENGLISH?????
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Old March 8th, 2012, 07:27 AM   #22
 
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Thread's been worked pretty hard, but I'd just add my experience since I run a couple thousand rounds a month. For additional background, I only use q tips and a boresnake to clean my firearms, and remoil for lubrication (white lithium on heavier caliber alloy frame rails).

I find zero difference. However I clean after every session right at the range and it just takes a couple minutes, so my experience may be different than yours.

Most reliable ammo I've found is also the cheapest, cases of CCI Blazer 40 gr lead round nose from a fellow on gunbroker - it's less than $150 per case delivered. I can't do better than that anywhere, even for federal bulk pack.

z.
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Old March 8th, 2012, 09:42 AM   #23
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Some of the posters missed the topic. This was about 22 ammo, not centerfire ammo.

Some general comments .... in a semi-auto pistol or rifle, all 22 ammo burns dirty because the guns are "blow back" operated. Any time you blow pressure back into the action, you are bound to get some powder residue along with it ... maybe some bullet lube too. I don't worry about which ammo blows more crud into the bowls of the gun because it all comes out easily with a decent cleaning. I had many Ruger 10/22s and Mark series pistols come into my gunsmith shop with bricks of ammo run through them without being field stripped and cleaned. They will work for a long time before the crud build up starts causing problems. I always recommend a through cleaning after each shooting session but in reality, it just isn't necessary.

My considerations for 22 ammo is how accurate it shoots, how well it functions and of course how much it costs, but not how dirty it burns. In a revolver, bolt action, lever action, pump, etc, most any 22 ammo will function fine and because they are not blow back operated, the action stays nice and clean no matter what ammo you use. Semi-autos tend to be more fussy with both function and accuracy. I've found CCI Mini-Mags function very well in nearly all semi-autos, are quite accurate, and very rarely have a dud or "pops instead of bangs". Federal bulk packs are my favorite for cheap plinking. They aren't quite as accurate, nor do they function quites as well, and they do have a few duds and more velocity variations .... but they are a fraction the price of CCI Mini-Mags so you can tollerate a slight loss in quality. With my S&W Mod 41 and my 10/22 with a match grade Green Mountain barrel (tight Bentz chamber) the expensive Wolff match grade standard velocity 22s are more accurate. The last brick I bought cost me $75 so they certainly aren't cheap. I also found with my two MK IIIs and 10/22 carbine (factory barrels), match grade ammo doesn't shoot as well or function as well as cheap Federal bulk packs.

I've given this lecture several time on the forum ... Oil and grease are your biggest enemies ... especially with semi-autos. Oil or grease will attract powder residue and create a sludge that is much more abrasive than running your gun bone dry, which will wear the gun out much faster. Most people that experience "dirty ammo" are guilty of using way too much lubrication. When I clean my guns, I apply a tiny dot of oil to the surface of the parts, spread it around, then wipe off any excess. Guns are not car engines or axil bearings so they don't have any high load bearing surfaces. As such, all you need is just enough oil to create a fine film ... primarily for rust prevention ... not for lubrication qualities. So ... before you blame ammo for burning dirty, eliminate grease completely and reduce the amount of oil you use to a minimum and you'll find the action in your gun will stay much cleaner and will last at least a few lifetimes.
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Old March 8th, 2012, 02:35 PM   #24
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Predatortoolworks View Post
Thread's been worked pretty hard, but I'd just add my experience since I run a couple thousand rounds a month. For additional background, I only use q tips and a boresnake to clean my firearms, and remoil for lubrication (white lithium on heavier caliber alloy frame rails).

I find zero difference. However I clean after every session right at the range and it just takes a couple minutes, so my experience may be different than yours.

Most reliable ammo I've found is also the cheapest, cases of CCI Blazer 40 gr lead round nose from a fellow on gunbroker - it's less than $150 per case delivered. I can't do better than that anywhere, even for federal bulk pack.

z.
I agree on the CCI Blazer.
I did some more testing today and the Blazer was much more accurate than the Federal for me. And as I've stated it is almost 100% reliable in my gun.
I'm starting to think this might be the better choice instead of the Federal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Iowegan View Post
Some of the posters missed the topic. This was about 22 ammo, not centerfire ammo.

Some general comments .... in a semi-auto pistol or rifle, all 22 ammo burns dirty because the guns are "blow back" operated. Any time you blow pressure back into the action, you are bound to get some powder residue along with it ... maybe some bullet lube too. I don't worry about which ammo blows more crud into the bowls of the gun because it all comes out easily with a decent cleaning. I had many Ruger 10/22s and Mark series pistols come into my gunsmith shop with bricks of ammo run through them without being field stripped and cleaned. They will work for a long time before the crud build up starts causing problems. I always recommend a through cleaning after each shooting session but in reality, it just isn't necessary.

My considerations for 22 ammo is how accurate it shoots, how well it functions and of course how much it costs, but not how dirty it burns. In a revolver, bolt action, lever action, pump, etc, most any 22 ammo will function fine and because they are not blow back operated, the action stays nice and clean no matter what ammo you use. Semi-autos tend to be more fussy with both function and accuracy. I've found CCI Mini-Mags function very well in nearly all semi-autos, are quite accurate, and very rarely have a dud or "pops instead of bangs". Federal bulk packs are my favorite for cheap plinking. They aren't quite as accurate, nor do they function quites as well, and they do have a few duds and more velocity variations .... but they are a fraction the price of CCI Mini-Mags so you can tollerate a slight loss in quality. With my S&W Mod 41 and my 10/22 with a match grade Green Mountain barrel (tight Bentz chamber) the expensive Wolff match grade standard velocity 22s are more accurate. The last brick I bought cost me $75 so they certainly aren't cheap. I also found with my two MK IIIs and 10/22 carbine (factory barrels), match grade ammo doesn't shoot as well or function as well as cheap Federal bulk packs.

I've given this lecture several time on the forum ... Oil and grease are your biggest enemies ... especially with semi-autos. Oil or grease will attract powder residue and create a sludge that is much more abrasive than running your gun bone dry, which will wear the gun out much faster. Most people that experience "dirty ammo" are guilty of using way too much lubrication. When I clean my guns, I apply a tiny dot of oil to the surface of the parts, spread it around, then wipe off any excess. Guns are not car engines or axil bearings so they don't have any high load bearing surfaces. As such, all you need is just enough oil to create a fine film ... primarily for rust prevention ... not for lubrication qualities. So ... before you blame ammo for burning dirty, eliminate grease completely and reduce the amount of oil you use to a minimum and you'll find the action in your gun will stay much cleaner and will last at least a few lifetimes.
Some very good info here and I agree with it.
When I clean and lube my guns I always wipe off all excess oil.
There is definitely no need to have oil running or dripping in the gun.
As you stated, more is not better in this case, and in fact does more harm than good.

Thanks again for all the info and comments.
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