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Poor extraction

This is a discussion on Poor extraction within the Ruger 10/22 Rimfire forums, part of the Rifle & Shotgun Forum category; Originally Posted by Abunchofboys I am having a similar issue with my 10/22 semi-auto. I either get a stovepipe or the spent ammo cartridge gets ...


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Old March 19th, 2014, 08:59 PM   #16
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Abunchofboys View Post
I am having a similar issue with my 10/22 semi-auto. I either get a stovepipe or the spent ammo cartridge gets stuck. It's only 2 weeks old and have put almost 200 rounds through it. Started marking my magazines to see if it's the same one. All the magazines are Ruger brand with steel lips. I have also tried Federal, Remington and Aguilla as well as another one that escapes me at the moment, so my guess is it's not the ammo. Guess I will try cleaning it and seeing if that helps.
Ya, I've pretty much given-up firing anything but stingers. Wonder why we hear these success stories with the older ones. 20 percent is stovepipes with standard velocity. Never does that with high velocity. That tells me not enough blowback to overcome friction. Is it possible your bolt is not oiled on all sides?
I tried to fire it with no oil to see where it was dragging, it wouldn't even fire twice.

I know the stingers are expensive but i assume I am wearing-down the rough spots, being steel on aluminum.




Last edited by Huey Chief; March 19th, 2014 at 09:12 PM.
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Old March 20th, 2014, 05:40 AM   #17
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huey Chief View Post
Ya, I've pretty much given-up firing anything but stingers. Wonder why we hear these success stories with the older ones. 20 percent is stovepipes with standard velocity. Never does that with high velocity. That tells me not enough blowback to overcome friction. Is it possible your bolt is not oiled on all sides?
I tried to fire it with no oil to see where it was dragging, it wouldn't even fire twice.

I know the stingers are expensive but i assume I am wearing-down the rough spots, being steel on aluminum.
Get some of this stuff Enco - Guaranteed Lowest Prices on Machinery, Measuring Tools, Cutting Tools and Shop Supplies and give it all a good rub between the bolt and receiver then wash with hot water and soap light oil it just a film. Make sure the spring for bolt is properly seated as well.
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Old March 20th, 2014, 03:53 PM   #18
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huey Chief View Post
Ya, I've pretty much given-up firing anything but stingers. Wonder why we hear these success stories with the older ones. 20 percent is stovepipes with standard velocity. Never does that with high velocity. That tells me not enough blowback to overcome friction. Is it possible your bolt is not oiled on all sides?
I tried to fire it with no oil to see where it was dragging, it wouldn't even fire twice.

I know the stingers are expensive but i assume I am wearing-down the rough spots, being steel on aluminum.
Just finding ammo in this state is near impossible. Found a store today that had a few bricks on the shelf but since I don't have my pistol permit yet, I cannot buy it.

Will check the oil on the bolt. It's entirely possible it's not oiled enough.
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Old April 12th, 2014, 07:15 AM   #19
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huey Chief View Post
Ya, I've pretty much given-up firing anything but stingers. Wonder why we hear these success stories with the older ones. 20 percent is stovepipes with standard velocity. Never does that with high velocity. That tells me not enough blowback to overcome friction. Is it possible your bolt is not oiled on all sides?
I tried to fire it with no oil to see where it was dragging, it wouldn't even fire twice.

I know the stingers are expensive but i assume I am wearing-down the rough spots, being steel on aluminum.
There are a few things you could try to fix that problem. First, get some gray Scotch Brite, or even 400 grit wet/dry sand paper, and polish smooth the inside of the entire receiver. That should remove any rough spots that may be snagging the bolt. If that doesn't solve the problem, you can order a Kidd guide rod and return spring set. The set comes with 3 different strength springs and a highly polished and hardened guide rod. The 10% reduced power spring may allow you to shoot standard velocity ammo without the problems you are now having.
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Old April 12th, 2014, 09:58 AM   #20
 
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I'd put a Kidd or volquartsen extractor in it.
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Old April 18th, 2014, 06:26 AM   #21
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huey Chief View Post
Ya, I've pretty much given-up firing anything but stingers. Wonder why we hear these success stories with the older ones. 20 percent is stovepipes with standard velocity. Never does that with high velocity. That tells me not enough blowback to overcome friction. Is it possible your bolt is not oiled on all sides?
I tried to fire it with no oil to see where it was dragging, it wouldn't even fire twice.

I know the stingers are expensive but i assume I am wearing-down the rough spots, being steel on aluminum.
Cleaned my rifle...only had maybe a hundred rounds through it but cleaned it anyway. Stovepipes and misfires pretty much stopped happening. Shortly after switched from Federal ammo to Remington. Had a fellow enthusiast tell me same guns, bought at same time, may like different ammo. Odd but hey, I am no expert so I figured I'd play around with different ammo. The one was much cheaper but eliminating the frustration of not being able to complete a magazine without issues is worth it, IMO.
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Old April 19th, 2014, 05:47 AM   #22
 
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Just took my new 10/22 for a quick scope-sighting drill. Nine rounds and CCI Stinger failed to extract the 10th. Did a thorough cleaning beforehand. Will run more rounds through it and give it a good polishing as recommended here.
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Old April 20th, 2014, 12:36 PM   #23
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Abunchofboys View Post
Cleaned my rifle...only had maybe a hundred rounds through it but cleaned it anyway. Stovepipes and misfires pretty much stopped happening. Shortly after switched from Federal ammo to Remington. Had a fellow enthusiast tell me same guns, bought at same time, may like different ammo. Odd but hey, I am no expert so I figured I'd play around with different ammo. The one was much cheaper but eliminating the frustration of not being able to complete a magazine without issues is worth it, IMO.
I ran into this recently on one of my 10/22s which has demonstrated the utmost reliability for 2-3 years, and it gets more and heavier use than the others in the steel matches. I had some bum ammo which had feeding problems, but then I started getting stovepipes which are out of character for this gun.

When I got it home I tore it down, and that means removing the bolt. Sure enough, just a lot of accumulated crud between the top and blind (left) side of the bolt and the receiver. The back end of the guide rod was filthy as well. And this is with using a dry lube, not oil. Once everything was clean again and freshly dry-lubed, it was back to full functionality and jam-free.

I noticed with my newest 10/22 with a painted receiver, there was a lot more built-up crud inside the receiver than with the anodized guns. The offending paint on the inside top of the receiver was mostly removed with scotchbrite, which has reduced the rapidlity of gunk build-up. If your receiver is a painted one (that black crinkle finish), you might consider doing the same. Meanwhile, I highly recommend removing the bolt to achieve a thorough cleaning.
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Old April 20th, 2014, 04:23 PM   #24
 
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If the extractor works when you manually cycle the bolt, why doesn't it work when the gasses cycle the bolt?
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Old April 20th, 2014, 07:46 PM   #25
 
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Originally Posted by Iguanadon View Post
If the extractor works when you manually cycle the bolt, why doesn't it work when the gasses cycle the bolt?
It's not that it doesn't cease to function, it's simply that it's not necessary. The blowback action already pushes the empty case back at the bolt face under normal circumstances, and with OEM parts there will likely be a clearance between the case rim and the back edge of the extractor. (This dimension is smaller with a headspaced bolt and aftermarket extractor.)

The force of the cartridge 'detonation' is enough to drive the bolt and empty case rearward, and the case hits either the ejector on the magazine or the ejector in the trigger group, which kicks the empty case out the ejection port.

What fouls up this sequence is when a dirty chamber grabs the cartridge case so tightly that blowback forces are insufficient to overcome that friction on the case. In the case of a standard 10/22 barrel with a lot of rounds through it without any chamber cleaning, using Stingers with their longer cases may precipitate an ejection problem which didn't exist with regular .22 LRs.
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Old June 1st, 2014, 04:57 PM   #26
 
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I just had a problem with brand new 10/22 carbine where the ejector wouldnt work for any rounds. A friend checked it out and compared it to working ones, and could see that the ejector couldnt reach the rim of the cartridge. The groove was too thick there. he took it completely apart, and it was a defect in the machining when it was manufactured, and he found the right size file and it was just a problem with the ejector groove by the edge, so he filed it off there so the groove was the same depth all the way like it was supposed to be. This was a brand new 10/22, bought in January 2014, but didnt take it out of the box and try to use until after Easter. SO, I am not impressed, and neither is he on the newer 10/22's. I have one about a year and a half old, and he has one that is decades old. He feels that the new one, besides this ejector groove problem is also lighter weight, and a few of the metal parts, like the ejector are a different color metal than our 2 older ones. ANother thing this new 10/22 has that is different is that the magazines do not release easily, which is going to be a problem as it was bought for my teen to take to appleseed, where she will need to do quick magazine changes.
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 02:36 PM   #27
 
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Originally Posted by Iowegan View Post
Pat-inCO, Your situation is normal ... most factory extractors work quite well. However, it is also very common to get a factory defective extractor. They are a stamped part that sometimes just don't work right. Any time you experience stovepipes or feeding problems, the very first thing to check is the extractor because it plays a roll in both scenarios. I like two aftermarket brands .... Power Custom and Volquartsen. They are machined ... not stamped and almost always fix extraction problems. The best 12 bucks you can spend on a 10/22 to end ammo fussiness. BTW, Ruger MK Series pistols use the same exact extractors and often suffer from the same exact problems. Same solution.
Take Iowegan's advice.

My 1022 from the 90s was a jamb-o-matic right out the box 40gr solid mini-mags (pretty much the gold standard for cycling 22 semi-autos) and nothing fixed it not ammo not lube not mags not anything.

Got a Sharp Claw titanium extractor and problem was immediately gone.

Got a new 1022 that has about 3k rounds thru it. Has never had a stove pipe that wasn't due to poor ammo quality or messing around with aftermarket springs in the trigger group or mags. Factory extractor is perfectly fine.

The extractor definitely has to hold the case tight inside the bolt head-space until it hits the ejector pin AND the round has to have enough power to move the bolt all the way to the rear during the cycle. If either doesn't happen it results in a stove pipe.

Last edited by ZommyGun; June 3rd, 2014 at 02:38 PM.
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Old March 3rd, 2016, 02:24 PM   #28
 
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Having the same issues with my new stainless Ruger 10/22. I will try a new ejector as well as try cleaning the receiver up it up. My buddy owns two older models of the 10/22 and they perform flawlessly. I must admit to being very disappointed as this purchase was meant to be for fun not aggravation. I hope that everyone is able to work out their respective ejection problems and enjoy their firearms.
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Old March 3rd, 2016, 06:53 PM   #29
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iowegan View Post
Pat-inCO, Your situation is normal ... most factory extractors work quite well. However, it is also very common to get a factory defective extractor. They are a stamped part that sometimes just don't work right. Any time you experience stovepipes or feeding problems, the very first thing to check is the extractor because it plays a roll in both scenarios. I like two aftermarket brands .... Power Custom and Volquartsen. They are machined ... not stamped and almost always fix extraction problems. The best 12 bucks you can spend on a 10/22 to end ammo fussiness. BTW, Ruger MK Series pistols use the same exact extractors and often suffer from the same exact problems. Same solution.
This. I've put VQ extractors in all of my Mark pistols and some of my 10/22s. They work great.
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Old December 31st, 2016, 06:41 PM   #30
 
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Check the firing pin bolt make sure it is flush on both sides. Not sticking out on one end . That was my problem.
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