Ruger Forum

RCBS Kits, Help deciding please

This is a discussion on RCBS Kits, Help deciding please within the Reloading forums, part of the Firearm Forum category; If you use the RCBS military crimp removal cutter for the Trim mate you will not need a primer pocket swage, you can save some ...


Go Back   Ruger Forum > Firearm Forum > Reloading

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes

Old July 1st, 2013, 10:51 PM   #16
 
429421Cowboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Montana
Posts: 1,131
429421Cowboy is on a distinguished road
If you use the RCBS military crimp removal cutter for the Trim mate you will not need a primer pocket swage, you can save some $$ there.

If you are going to load pistol as well, or a lot of .223 you will be well served to get a Uniflow powder measure in addition to the 1500, trust me you do not want to wait to weigh each and every 9mm charge when you could just throw them from the measure and weigh every 10th one to check.
Same goes for a hand primer for large batches of pistol brass, if you are loading any kind of volume you will appreciate priming off-press.

On the .38/357 dies, I am not sure why they have revolver dies that are taper crimp, usually they are roll crimp and that is my preference for revolvers.
Depriming will be mostly served by your sizing dies, if you wish to deprime the military brass before sizing I would say the Lee universal decapping die will be your tool.
The powder funnel doesn't have to be that fancy, you can get along with a universal RCBS just fine to save some $$, and for as cheap as the loading tray is I'd say get two, they are handy.
The three books you chose will get you from A to B on 99% of anything you may happen to run across, those are very good choices.
Take care!




Last edited by 429421Cowboy; July 1st, 2013 at 11:01 PM.
429421Cowboy is offline  
Advertisements
Old July 2nd, 2013, 05:06 AM   #17
 
Waveform's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Florida
Posts: 4,075
Waveform will become famous soon enough
You're certainly headed in the right direction but don't get overwhelmed in "analysis paralysis". I took the plunge last year and bought the mid-range RCBS kit from Cabela's. I knew I wanted a digital scale and a few other things that were upgrades. I also bought a media tumbler at the same time. When I bought my kit I couldn't find a better deal anywhere - Cabela's had it on sale plus I had a coupon for free shipping and RCBS had a $50 rebate offer. Midway couldn't come close at that time plus I recall there weren't too many places that even carried that particular kit. So don't assume one retailer will always have a better deal than another - shop around.

I've had a lot of hobbies and interests over the years and have come to realize I never get it exactly right the first time. It's only after you get into it a while do you realize or discover things you wish you had and regret the stuff you bought that you don't use. That's been my experience anyway.
Waveform is offline  
Old July 2nd, 2013, 07:12 AM   #18
 
Wolfie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,632
Wolfie is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by 429421Cowboy View Post
If you use the RCBS military crimp removal cutter for the Trim mate you will not need a primer pocket swage, you can save some $$ there.
I was not sure if I still needed to swage the pockets or if simply crimp removal was sufficient. I have a bunch of military 223 and 30-06 to deal with at this time. After that, not sure how much military brass I will be obtaining but I see the koren surplus 223 is pretty cheap right now

Quote:
Originally Posted by 429421Cowboy View Post
If you are going to load pistol as well, or a lot of .223 you will be well served to get a Uniflow powder measure in addition to the 1500, trust me you do not want to wait to weigh each and every 9mm charge when you could just throw them from the measure and weigh every 10th one to check.
Really? Measuring each load I thought was a good idea. At least at first. I was under the impression the 1500/dispenser could be dropping powder into the tray while I was seating a bullet, depositing that round in a container and inserting the next prepped piece of brass into the press.. If I use a uniflow and have to dispense each one, am I not stopping the operation to do so? I thought it would be overall faster as I was doing work while the powder was being measured. I am asking here.

In general, speed is not the highest priority here. At first I want to focus on each round being the best I can not chunking out 1k rounds in a weekend. At this time, I don't own a scary black gun, unless you consider my Savage Model 93 scary I am not loading up 30rds in mags and spray and pray shooting. I am, except for 9mm and .22, loading and firing one round at a time. Loading speed is good, don't get me wrong there. But I am looking at eventually crafting 223 and 30-06 for distance and accuracy. The 38 and 9mm are for range practice so a reasonable volume is good but I am not looking to be in competition with Remmington

So, let me list some priorities here...
1. Save money. Yea, I know I will be deeply in the hole to start with. Get that. But after I recoup the initial investment then I can begin saving money, long term. And I know that point is a lot of rounds down the road. At some point, the reloading will become a money saver.

2. Ammo availability. With things the way they are, just about the ONLY ammo I can walk in and buy at LGS are 30-06 (at a $1 a round) or .17HMR (not reloadable). So my second goal here is to replenish my ammo supply as I shoot it. That applies to 223, 30-06, 9mm and 38spcl. I have not seen a round of 38 except for critical duty (so not range ammo) on the shelves in a month. Eventually I can learn and begin to cast my 9mm and 38 bullets from scrap lead which will be just fine for range time. And also later, I can advance into producing 224 bullets from my .22 casings and cut costs and not have to depend on buying bullets for my 223 reloads. Even more self dependence. Bulllet casting/swaging is a long time down the road though.

3. Fine tune loads to my rifles. This is mainly for the 223 and 30-06. I eventually want to stretch those out past 100yd onto our 600yd range. That is where the hand loading will eventually pay off. By the time I am able to shoot there, I should be able to load for it too.

4. Winter Hobby. I (currently) live in Wisconsin. I so can't imagine I will be out on the range much in the winter around here. Its usually freaking cold and snowy. Not my idea of fun at the range weather. So, I will gather brass and supplies during the spring/summer/fall months and I can process the loads over the winter months in my basement to re-stock my ammo stocks for the following summer season.

What are NOT priorities...
1. Speed. Not interested in turning out thousands of rounds over a weekend. At least right now. If this becomes a factor in the future, well, then fine, I can look at a progressive press and gear up for it. But by the time that happens I, God willing, will know what the hell I am doing with reloading at that point.

2. Selling. Not interested in doing this as a business. Too many regulations, to much headache, too much BS.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 429421Cowboy View Post
Same goes for a hand primer for large batches of pistol brass, if you are loading any kind of volume you will appreciate priming off-press.
So would the standard hand primer do or should it be the universal one (more $$$)

Quote:
Originally Posted by 429421Cowboy View Post
On the .38/357 dies, I am not sure why they have revolver dies that are taper crimp, usually they are roll crimp and that is my preference for revolvers.
Can you suggest a proper set of dies then please.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 429421Cowboy View Post
Depriming will be mostly served by your sizing dies, if you wish to deprime the military brass before sizing I would say the Lee universal decapping die will be your tool.
Link so I can see the correct item please.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 429421Cowboy View Post
The powder funnel doesn't have to be that fancy, you can get along with a universal RCBS just fine to save some $$, and for as cheap as the loading tray is I'd say get two, they are handy.
We are only talking $10 here between a funnel kit and a basic one. Not a real back breaker. And yea, I planned to get probably 4 trays. I simply listed it as the selected one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 429421Cowboy View Post
The three books you chose will get you from A to B on 99% of anything you may happen to run across, those are very good choices.
Take care!
Whew! Good. There are so many books out there. It was harder to come to a decision on which book than it was to decide on a press!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waveform View Post
You're certainly headed in the right direction but don't get overwhelmed in "analysis paralysis".
I do tend to do that I must admit. But this is a big investment. I wanted to explore the options and get some feedback from folks who actually do this before buying anything. I thought it a good way to focus my money in the proper areas rather than getting a bunch of equipment that was either unnecessary or would have to be replaced as it was not up to the task of precision loads later.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waveform View Post
I took the plunge last year and bought the mid-range RCBS kit from Cabela's. I knew I wanted a digital scale and a few other things that were upgrades.
I am also hunting for a decent and accurate pair of calipers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waveform View Post
I also bought a media tumbler at the same time.
I have my old steel drum rock tumbler from the early 70's (though mine is not so bright and shiny anymore):


In all likelihood I will end up getting another one, probably a viberatory type to run multiple groups of brass through.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waveform View Post
When I bought my kit I couldn't find a better deal anywhere - Cabela's had it on sale plus I had a coupon for free shipping and RCBS had a $50 rebate offer. Midway couldn't come close at that time plus I recall there weren't too many places that even carried that particular kit. So don't assume one retailer will always have a better deal than another - shop around.
I only used Midway (for the most part) at this time as a uniform source for price comparison between different items. By using a single retailer I can see the relative price difference between item A and item B and not have a price difference between Midway and Cabelas rolled into the situation. I will, of course, seek out the best deal once I commit to buy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waveform View Post
I've had a lot of hobbies and interests over the years and have come to realize I never get it exactly right the first time. It's only after you get into it a while do you realize or discover things you wish you had and regret the stuff you bought that you don't use. That's been my experience anyway.
Aye, me too. Been there. Done that. Trying very hard not to do it again But I am quite sure I will end up with dust collectors in this hobby as well.
Wolfie is offline  
Old July 2nd, 2013, 07:24 PM   #19
 
moakes58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 4,248
moakes58 is on a distinguished road
Calipers I can help with. Harbor Freight-6" digital-$10 & the same electronic unit as every one else's $30 pair. The work great!
moakes58 is offline  
Old July 2nd, 2013, 10:21 PM   #20
Larry the Conservative
 
stargeezer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: ILLi-nois
Posts: 5,250
stargeezer will become famous soon enough
I just checked my hand primer, it's the universal - I don't know the difference between the two.

Typically, I cycle my uniflow ten or 15 times, just dropping the first charges into a container which I dump back into the resorvour. This help settle the powder for a more even metering. Then I adjust the load for the proper weight. Once that's established I set 50 pieces of brass in a loading block and dump a charge into each of the 50. I then look the loads over very carefully, looking for any that visually appear different. Any that are questionable, I pull and weigh the charge that was dropped - it's almost always a case of a case being made of thicker material, or there was a dent I had not seen. In any event I check 5 charges min. With a good electronic scale it only takes a moment to check a load, then dump it back into the case. Following that I cap each with it's bullet (this helps me to not spill powder when moving from the block to the press).

This process will be much faster than waiting for the electronic powder measure to do it's thing, while maintaing high quality.
stargeezer is online now  
Old July 4th, 2013, 12:13 PM   #21
 
TX Wheelgunner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 276
TX Wheelgunner is on a distinguished road
Geezer
I use the uniflow powder measure and dump the powder out of the case into my scale cup then back into the case Once I get it right I check every ten rounds. I have the hand primer. I have to change the shell holder when changing calibers. I dont know about the universal hand primer.
TX Wheelgunner is offline  
Old July 4th, 2013, 06:37 PM   #22
Larry the Conservative
 
stargeezer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: ILLi-nois
Posts: 5,250
stargeezer will become famous soon enough
I also must change the shell holder in the Universal Hand Primer when changing calibers.

** One note about the Universal Hand Primer I have, only RCBS Shellholders work in it.**

I can't say that this is the same for the other hand primer. This was my only disappointment with this primer tool. A few years ago a LGS was going out of business and I bought a big box of mixed Lyman reloading accessories at their auction. In the box was about 3 of every shellholder that Lyman makes. So with this RCBS priming tool only accepting their holders, I might have been forced to purchase duplicates of those I already had, but after carefully examining the different holders, I determined that the only difference was a angled chamfer on the bottom of the holder. A few minutes on the lathe and all my Lyman holders fit the RCBS tool. You might be able to do the same thing with a drill press and a large bit, but I didn't try that.

This was not a deal breaker for me with the Hand Primer. I had used the old style Lee hand primer for 30 years, but when it was accidentally knocked off a shelf onto a concrete floor it was totaled. Plastic and concrete does not mix. I did order a replacement Lee tool, not knowing that it had been completely changed. The "upgraded" tool was a pale shadow of it's predecessor and to my eye, not worth the cost of shipping back. It now resides with other tools I've purchased from Lee, in a box under a workbench in my garage.
stargeezer is online now  
Old July 7th, 2013, 09:49 AM   #23
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Northern California
Posts: 181
Bob Lewis is on a distinguished road
You don't say what the .30'06 is,bolt, semi auto? What is your intended use ,competitive shooting,casual target,or hunting? If other than bolt you may want to consider small base dies for it as well as the .223. If both are bolt rifles then standard dies are good for the .223 and .30'06. Look at the RCBS 3 way trim head it trims ,chamfers and de-burrs at the same time get 1 head and the caliber specific chamfering pilot. I believe you should get a good caliper to start with,which you should get any way and you can forgo the case length gauge the sizing dies will take care of this. You should also get a good balance beam scale for load development with or without the electronic scale and a powder trickler. A bullet puller either inertia or collet type will be handy,I like the collet type. Good luck have fun and Be SAFE.
Bob Lewis is offline  
Old July 8th, 2013, 08:44 AM   #24
 
Wolfie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,632
Wolfie is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lewis View Post
You don't say what the .30'06 is,bolt, semi auto? What is your intended use ,competitive shooting,casual target,or hunting? If other than bolt you may want to consider small base dies for it as well as the .223. If both are bolt rifles then standard dies are good for the .223 and .30'06. Look at the RCBS 3 way trim head it trims ,chamfers and de-burrs at the same time get 1 head and the caliber specific chamfering pilot. I believe you should get a good caliper to start with,which you should get any way and you can forgo the case length gauge the sizing dies will take care of this. You should also get a good balance beam scale for load development with or without the electronic scale and a powder trickler. A bullet puller either inertia or collet type will be handy,I like the collet type. Good luck have fun and Be SAFE.
Thank you Bob. I think I mentioned the rifles in another thread but didn't here. The 223 is a 70's model 700 with bull barrel, bolt action. The 30-06 is a 1942 1903A3 receiver with sporter stock and barrel, also bolt action.

I agree on the calipers. Always a good investment.

I stated my general goals earlier in this thread but I guess I missed putting anything about the loads. At first its generally going to be ammo replenishment, target shooting, plinking 223. Later I wanted to get into custom loads for longer range target shooting and possibly hunting. As for the 38 and 9mm pistol, all target loads, nothing special there simple ammo replenishment.

I do have a beam scale, but no calibration check weights.


Dad gave it to me a couple weeks ago. Its the only reloading equipment he had left. He had already sold off all his presses and such years ago.

I forgot to list the bullet puller. I do intend to get one as I already have a few duds that I can recover the components from (brass and bullet). Do you have any specific models you prefer? Links would be helpful if you have them.
Wolfie is offline  
Old July 11th, 2013, 12:00 PM   #25
 
Wolfie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,632
Wolfie is on a distinguished road
Well, I just built a wishlist over at Midway...
Wish List Total: $1,170.28

No extra fluff in it, just the basics for the calibers I intend to reload. Now I just need to whet out the beginning components and pick a starter round to reload.

Thinking 9mm as its pretty common and should be easy to load out of the chute. Also thinking I can put off the Case Prep center for the 9mm but will need it for the 223 and 30-06 for military deburring etc.
Wish List Total: $796.91
MidwayUSA - Wish List

Progression in calibers:
9mm
223
30-06
38 spl

Possible addons later...
308 Win
380
40 cal

I have been saving and tumbling my brass from the range and have about 500 223, 200 38spcl, 100 30-06 and about 300 9mm saved and tumbled. Though all still have primers.

I am looking to get the books first and do some reading and then begin to shop around for the equipment and components. I have also not completely committed to the digital scale and auto powder measure. I am still exploring those options but listed it in the wish lists as its higher price than the manual options and pads the list price as a worst case.


Thoughts?
Wolfie is offline  
Old July 13th, 2013, 05:44 AM   #26
 
429421Cowboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Montana
Posts: 1,131
429421Cowboy is on a distinguished road
Lee Universal Depriming Decapping Die The link to the Universal decapping die, a good investment towards dealing with military brass.

My suggestion after looking at your caliber list would be to begin loading with the .38 spl, for several reasons.
The first would be safety and ease of loading. A straight wall pistol round is about the easiest thing out there to learn on, and in lighter loads will offer you some room for error and let you get the hang of things first. You don't even have to worry about crimp if you don't want to on many loads, where as with an auto pistol a perfect crimp is needed. Also, the 9mm is a very small capacity case and operates at very high pressure with NO room for error in charge weight, seating depth or change in components, anything different can cause pressures to skyrocket. There is a reason for a long time many experts and manuals recommended just buying your 9mm ammo because it was cheap and not worth the hassle. Improper neck tension or crimp can cause bullet setback during feeding in the magazine and shove a bullet deep into the case, which is a bad thing! Also, with a revolver, pretty much all ammo will feed in it, while an auto pistol requires some adjustment to get the charge just right to cycle the slide.

The second reason to start with the .38 is that at least around here it seems to be way easier to find .38 components, especially bullets as compared to the 9mm. While I have not looked at tooling up for .38/.357 I suspect that dies and such are also much more available as well.

Some more thoughts for you! Take care.
429421Cowboy is offline  
Old July 18th, 2013, 07:55 PM   #27
 
BassMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: out west
Posts: 823
BassMan is on a distinguished road
Start with a good cast iron "O" type press and add various items as needed.

You will need:

trim cases to specified lengths - I have a Forster and Redding case trimmers and these have worked well. Others might work well for you and might be worth looking at. I prefer the Redding trimmer because it spins the brass case and is sort of like a mini lathe. I small tool to chamfer inside and outside case necks is used.

need dies - I have used RCBS, Redding, Hornady. When starting full length dies are the easiest to use. Get seating dies for each caliber.

need to prime cases -- I am not into mass production of ammo but I can prime many cases using the Lee press mounted priming tool. It costs less than $15.00 but requires Lee shell holders. RCBS shell holders might fit if the Lee priming tool is modified. Comes in small and large primer sizes.

measure cases -- a dial caliper is best to do this.

lubricate cases -- I use Lee sizing lube, comes in a 2 oz tube and is like wax.

eventually you will stick a case into a die -- RCBS makes a stuck case extractor.

weigh powder -- a simple balance beam scale will do this. I have used a RCBS scale for years.

measure powder -- a powder measure does this, I have used the same RCBS measure for over 40 years.

manuals - these make you smart, read and understand them, acquire common sense, learn how things work

a good bench, get a real strong as big as possible one to mount all your tools on.

acquire components - build 1 inch thick wood boxes to hold powder. Read SAMMI pubs regarding powder storage.

wear eye protection and buy nitrile gloves when handling components that contain certain components that are toxic.

keep notes -- a note book, Computer software like word processor & spread sheet are useful

get a dust pan and fire extinguisher near your operation.

I load about 2500 rounds per year of rifle and about 1000 rounds of pistol. I pay attention to what I am doing. Most of my rifles get sub 1 inch groups and fail to fire or eject don't occur.

Last edited by BassMan; July 18th, 2013 at 08:00 PM.
BassMan is offline  
Old July 19th, 2013, 05:22 AM   #28
 
SouthSideScubaSteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: South suburbs of Chicago
Posts: 897
SouthSideScubaSteve is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by BassMan View Post
Start with a good cast iron "O" type press and add various items as needed.

......
acquire components - build 1 inch thick wood boxes to hold powder...... Read SAMMI pubs regarding powder storage.

....
BassMan - I'm just looking into reloading (it's not a matter if "if" I'll start, but when) but am reading/researching all I can on the subject; that said a couple of questions re: your post...

What's a "O"type press??

Why store powder in a 1" wood box rather than the original container?

Can the "SAMMI pubs" be found on the web??

Thanks in advance for your insight & help!
SouthSideScubaSteve is offline  
Old July 19th, 2013, 06:14 AM   #29
 
opos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,006
opos will become famous soon enoughopos will become famous soon enough
I just want to present a little dose of reality with a different view....I'm a lower volume loader and been loading for quite a while..I just pick up a piece of equipment here and there based on what I've needed and what works for me..This is my "el cheapo" set up that makes dandy ammo at a reasonable rate for me.

Lee Classic Cast single stage press with breech lock adapters....$150
Lee "hand press" with breech lock adapters.....$50
Lee old style (new) Auto Prime off E bay....$25
Lee Dippers (I don't use a powder measure)..$10
RCBS 505 scale (like new) off E bay...$50
Lee carbide 38-357 4 die deluxe set...$45
Lee carbide 45 Colt 4 die deluxe set...$45
Lee carbide 44 mag/special 4 die deluxe set..$45
Lee 7.62x54 die set....$45
Lee 8mm die set...$45
Lee dedicated decapping die
Lee extra decapping pins (they do break now and again)..$10
RCBS powder trickler..E bay...$15
Misc funnels, load blocks, dial calipers, etc..est $100 (misc sources)
Lee case trim equip (manual) for rifle calibers...E bay...$50
Tumbler...I wash my cases in a bucket.
Misc loading manuals....E bay....$125


Everything I need to load all the calibers I load (5 of them) including dies, single stage press, hand press, primer, case prep, manuals, etc. I load in stages and can easily turn out 400-500 rounds a week if I want to..normally only shoot a couple hundred rounds a week when I'm shooting regularly.

Cost was about $800 total

I list this all because I really do it "on the cheap" and it still adds up to way more than a person might think..When I look at equipment I "need" I can write it all down and figure it all out and then if I'm "honest" with myself I just double it and I'm close. Things like boxes for loaded rounds at a couple of bucks each...little shelves and boxes to hold components all add up...special lights to light the work so I don't double charge or miss a charge,
just all the little "10 buck items" a person forgets about. Don't budget too tight....just get into it a caliber at a time...I agree that the 38 special is the most basic and "safest" thing to start out with..it's really straight forward and helps to develop good habits for safe loading on down the line.

Last edited by opos; July 19th, 2013 at 06:22 AM.
opos is offline  
Old July 19th, 2013, 06:26 AM   #30
Larry the Conservative
 
stargeezer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: ILLi-nois
Posts: 5,250
stargeezer will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthSideScubaSteve View Post
BassMan - I'm just looking into reloading (it's not a matter if "if" I'll start, but when) but am reading/researching all I can on the subject; that said a couple of questions re: your post...

What's a "O"type press??

Why store powder in a 1" wood box rather than the original container?

Can the "SAMMI pubs" be found on the web??

Thanks in advance for your insight & help!
The Rock Chucker is an example of a "O" type of press. And I generally agree, except the cast iron open frame presses of today are much less susctable to the flexing that made them a bad investment years ago. My RCBS turret press is a open frame and I've loaded some big, hard to size cartridges with it without problems. Years ago Lee had marketed a open frame AL frame press that flexed so bad that you could not load anything except small rounds like 9mm or 38 spl. with any consistency.

I can't address the SAMMI pub question either except to say that years ago you bought powder in metal canisters and before that wood kegs. I was dismayed to see powder in plastic containers, but can only assume they've done the testing and they are safe. Even black powder comes in plastic containers today.

Powder storage is a concern once you have lots of powder on hand. There are specs, but I don't know what they are, but here's what I do; I keep all my back stock of powder in a locked metal box that's equipped with good castors. It measures about 20" square and 3' tall and one side is the door. The box is made of 14ga steel and all edges are completely welded and the hinges are welded to the box. Since I buy most (but not all) of the powders I use in 8lb jugs the size of the box was driven by how many of these jugs I could get into the box. Lastly there is big bare copper bolt sticking out of one side, this gives me a place to attach a ground clamp with a lead that goes outdoors to a ground rod.

**This is so overkill for most reloaders.**

If you have a handful of 1lb bottles of powder, don't worry about it. When you get to the point that you have 20-30lbs of powder sitting around, you should start to think about proper storage. If you get to the point that you have 50lbs around, start thinking about a bunker.
stargeezer is online now  
Reply

  Ruger Forum > Firearm Forum > Reloading



Search tags for this page
bass pro rcbs 3 die carbide taper crimp 45acp
,
rcbs master reloading kit reviews
,
rcbs rock chucker supreme deluxe reloading kit
,
rcbs rock chucker supreme deluxe reloading kit review
,
rcbs rock chucker supreme master deluxe reloading kit
,
rcbs rockchucker 1v china
,
rcbs supreme deluxe kit
,
rcbs supreme deluxe reloading kit
,
rcbs trim pro manual
,
rock chucker supreme master kit
,

whats the difference between rcbs kits

,
wilson-micrometer-case-trimmer-stainless-steel-case-trimming-kit
Click on a term to search for related topics.

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Ruger Forum Discussions
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need help deciding on a 9mm my wife can shoot with me wesnellans Ruger Pistols 41 October 26th, 2012 08:13 PM
Deciding on .22LR snubbie, LCR or 317? bearcatter Pistols & Revolvers 6 June 15th, 2012 07:25 AM
Help Deciding... wolverine3 Ruger Double Action 8 February 21st, 2012 04:49 PM
Help deciding on a new 22 samheu94 Rifles 8 January 6th, 2012 06:22 AM
Need help deciding on 1911 Chebb Pistols & Revolvers 34 March 30th, 2011 09:35 PM

Top Gun Sites Top Sites List  
Powered by vBulletin 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright © 2006 - 2014 Ruger Forum. All rights reserved.
Ruger Forum is a Ruger Firearms enthusiast's forum, but it is in no way affiliated with, nor does it represent Sturm Ruger & Company Inc. of Southport, CT.