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Need Some Help with Reloads

This is a discussion on Need Some Help with Reloads within the Reloading forums, part of the Firearm Forum category; I reloaded some 9mm. I used Winchester brass, CCI Small Pistol Primers, Hornady 115 gr FMJ RN bullets, & started with 4.2 gr of Universal. ...


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Old April 21st, 2012, 07:08 PM   #1
 
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Need Some Help with Reloads

I reloaded some 9mm. I used Winchester brass, CCI Small Pistol Primers, Hornady 115 gr FMJ RN bullets, & started with 4.2 gr of Universal. I shot some reloads today in my Ruger SR9c. The shells would not eject. They would start out the barrel & get caught in the chamber. I tried the same set up with 4.5 fr of Universal. Did the same. But did eject a few.

I can shoot factory load with no problems. Any suggestions of what I might be doing wrong or should check. I am new to reloading & these were my first loads.

Thanks for any suggestions .



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Old April 21st, 2012, 07:56 PM   #2
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What was your COL ?
Are you doing a good firm crimp?
With 4.5 gr you should get 1100 fps with a 4" barrel which is a good load.
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Old April 21st, 2012, 08:14 PM   #3
 
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Your load and all the component your using look good, I can only think of 2 things did you get the over all lenght correct with bullet seated? and did you get a good crimp? to light of crimp you could be loosing pressure making gun not eject, almost sounds like not enough powder as well but if your scale weighed it correctly you have plenty.
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 08:18 AM   #4
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pastortlc View Post
The shells would not eject. They would start out the barrel & get caught in the chamber.
It wouldn't seem like to many, but the 9mm is one of the tougher rounds to handload for. There are a few reasons for that:

The cartridge has a very narrow range of pressure to work in.
Pressures run quite high, despite the small size.
Any variation in brass thickness often has a noticeible effect on case capacity.
Tiny differences in seating depth have big effects on pressures.
Primer/powder variation will have a big effect on everything.

Then there's the gun itself. They come in all sizes, and the smaller versions rely on heavier springs, making it even more difficult to get a good reliable load.

When loading for the 9mm, I've learned to sort all brass by head stamp.

Then with a single brand of brass, I work up in 0.2gr increments, using an OAL for the bullet that cycles through a full magazine. (NOT loaded ammo here). You are almost certainly on the low end no matter what the manual says. Hot loads leave the gun in a big hurry, and land far away.

When you reach a charge weight that shows reliable function for 4-5 clips, check to see where you are in the manual. If you a gr or so short, you can add another couple 1/10ths. If you change anything, brass, primers, new lot of powder, bullet, start over. With faster powders, you can go from dud to detonated in a hurry, so be careful with that.
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 10:05 AM   #5
 
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Cartridge Loads - Hodgdon Reloading Data Center - data.hodgdon.com

Youre going to want a COL of 1.125

I use the same with my Alliant powders. This is probably your problem, they are using 4.5 as theyre starting load, so I would try that out with the correct overall lenght.

I actually thought 9mm was fairly easy to load for. Shot 1500 so far with a variety of powders and never had a single malfunction. all 1500 have been with 6 different mixed brass headstamps also ranging from Rem, Fed, Win to AP10, PMC, G.F.L. Never had any problem mixing brass.

Unless you have the time or the are going for extreme accuracy, I don't think think sorting brass is going to be needed. If you do that, you might as well adjust the seating and crimp for every brand you use since every brand will be slightly different lenghts at the rim. Not saying its not a bad idea, just very time consuming and not needed if youre doing casual shooting
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 10:13 AM   #6
 
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Also never saw a problem with crimp, I use plated bullets so you cant put a real crimp on them in general, pretty light. Your universal is right in the middle for pistol burn rates #36, so a crimp is good, but a heavy crimp isnt going to have drastic effects as if you had a slow burning powder. I tried out my old powder before I switched to plated. #60 Blue Dot (which is definitely towards the slow end, I think pistol powders end somewhere around 75 on the chart) with that real slight crimp out and while it was dirty without a real crimp, they still functioned great and were extremely accurate.

I think OAL is your answer here.
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 10:35 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by RiverRider View Post
I fail to see a connection between OAL or crimp to extraction and ejection---unless the OAL and/or crimp is affecting pressure and velocity. Please enlighten me.
If the OAL is longer than recommended than chamber pressure and bullet velocity will be lower. If the chamber pressure is too low it will not properly cycle the action thus the failure to fully extract and eject the spent shell.
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 11:35 AM   #8
 
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Greetings,

The good old fashioned straight wall revolver rounds are much more forgiving when it comes to reloading. Because they are controlled by the rim of the case, instead of the tapered case mouth of the wonder nine. With a reliable revolver, you can load from mild to wild without worrying if there is enough pressure to cycle the weapon to load the next round or a stove pipe jam. Further, the revolver can handle lead bullets without feeding issues which are cheaper to shoot than FMJ auto rounds.

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Old April 22nd, 2012, 11:50 AM   #9
 
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I would go back and recheck everything. Make sure your scale is working correctly. I have never had any problems reloading 9mm. I have used the same loads in diferent brands of brass (Win, Rem and Fed cases. I use info from at least 3 different manuals and am always safely below max loads.
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 01:36 PM   #10
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RiverRider View Post
I fail to see a connection between OAL or crimp to extraction and ejection---unless the OAL and/or crimp is affecting pressure and velocity. Please enlighten me.
Prime example of why you should read your reloading manual!

Too long and might get a bullet that doesnt function properly or fit your mag or chamber, could still lead to over pressure if your bullet is firmly on the rifling.

Too shot and the excess pressure might blow your gun up.

Why bullet setback is a big issue and why you should never chamber the same round from your magazine over and over again. Hitting that feed ramp over and over again will loosen up the crimp and eventually reduce the OAL of your rounds, increasing pressure.
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 02:13 PM   #11
 
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According tothe Hornady Reloading Handbook, using the 115 grain FMJ-RN bullet, the correct C.O.L. is 1.100" and 4.5 gr. of Clays Universal is the MAXIMUM LOAD for that powder. I would think your taper crimp and your C.O.L. be checked.

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Old April 22nd, 2012, 02:28 PM   #12
 
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If you check the website, it says they used 1.125 and goes up to 5.0.

I just got the new Hornady 8th and I was dissapointed how they didn't have a variety of powders and how they neutered the max charges. Also slacking on the over all information, I have a 20 year old Lyman and while there aren't as many calibers in it, there is FAR more information about shooting overall.
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 05:38 PM   #13
 
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On the Hogdon website the 115gn jacketed bullet is a hollow point, seating a FMJ to that same OAL would probably increase the pressure considerably.
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 07:15 PM   #14
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Okay, then it is as I thought.

Where in West Texas, TMD? I am from the trans-Pecos myself.
I'm not that far west, just barely left of center in San Angelo.
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 07:22 PM   #15
 
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If I offended you, then I apoligize.

I just recently got the Hornady 8th and I noticed that it has far less information than my 20 year old Lyman about shooting in general so if you guys are in the market for a new manual or have a friend who has a Lyman, I suggest reading that. The Hornady has far more calibers than I thought even existed, but I found it to be very specific on which powders they use for each caliber. Not as much flexibility there.
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