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45 lc h110

This is a discussion on 45 lc h110 within the Reloading forums, part of the Firearm Forum category; evening all, i am working up loads for my new blackhawk hunter. i am using sieara 300gr fp .4515 i am around 22 gr of ...


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Old December 13th, 2009, 03:24 PM   #1
 
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45 lc h110

evening all, i am working up loads for my new blackhawk hunter. i am using sieara 300gr fp .4515 i am around 22 gr of h110 and was wondering what your h110 load is with a 300 gr bullet.



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Old December 13th, 2009, 06:31 PM   #2
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 14cm View Post
evening all, i am working up loads for my new blackhawk hunter. i am using sieara 300gr fp .4515 i am around 22 gr of h110 and was wondering what your h110 load is with a 300 gr bullet.
I have a Ruger BH but don't load it up to max. go to Hodgdon - The Gun Powder People and check out their load data.I also have a TC Encore 15" 454 casull pistol and with this I can load 45 colt ammo for a bit more performance.

Last edited by scr83jp; December 31st, 2009 at 04:54 PM.
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Old December 13th, 2009, 07:23 PM   #3
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14cm, Speer #14 lists a max H-110 load with a 300 gr JFP at 23.5 gr that cranks 1156 fps from a 7 1/2" barrel.
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Old December 15th, 2009, 02:11 PM   #4
 
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I have tried some 300 grain Sierra's .4515's with 23.5 of H110, but out of my 4" Redhawk I only got 1092 FPS. That is as high as I dare load these for Jacketed 300 grain pills. I am gonna try some LBT 325 grain bullets in a couple of weeks and hope that increases the speed a bit. I have heard there can be as much difference as 300 FPS or more between identical loads of lead and jacketed bullets.

Last edited by 45longcolt; December 15th, 2009 at 02:15 PM.
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Old December 16th, 2009, 04:53 AM   #5
 
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I applaud the use of 300 grain bullets, the 45 is capable of so much more with this size bullet and it dramatically increases energy as compared to the traditional 250 grain loads. I don't care for H110 at all, I much prefer 2400. When comparing loads of similar velocity 2400 does not have the muzzle blast, concussion, or flame shooting everywhere that H110 does. It is even unpleasant for others you're shooting with. If I want to hot rod, 2400 does everything I need it to do, and a 300 grain bullet at 1100+ will knock down just about anything you need to shoot.
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Old December 16th, 2009, 06:52 AM   #6
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45longcolt, There's no such thing as a free lunch ..... increasing the bullet weight with the same powder charge also increases chamber pressure. Additionally, lead bullets create more chamber pressure than jacketed because they seal better. You might get 300 fps more velocity but the chamber pressure will elevate to dangerous levels. Your gun ... your risk .... I sure wouldn't try it.
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Old December 16th, 2009, 07:57 AM   #7
 
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45longcolt, There's no such thing as a free lunch ..... increasing the bullet weight with the same powder charge also increases chamber pressure. Additionally, lead bullets create more chamber pressure than jacketed because they seal better. You might get 300 fps more velocity but the chamber pressure will elevate to dangerous levels. Your gun ... your risk .... I sure wouldn't try it.
I have not loaded any of those yet but I will back the charge down and work up.
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Old December 30th, 2009, 08:24 AM   #8
 
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Additionally, lead bullets create more chamber pressure than jacketed because they seal better. You might get 300 fps more velocity but the chamber pressure will elevate to dangerous levels. Your gun ... your risk .... I sure wouldn't try it.
Is that right? I thought it was the other way around and the lead would give you lower pressure because it moves out quicker.
Not that I am any kind of expert, just askin.

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Old December 30th, 2009, 09:04 AM   #9
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mobius, Yes, that's right. Lots of myths in reloading and this is one of them. Both jacketed and lead bullets move out of the case at the same rate ... it's purely a product of weight vs pressure. Because jacketed bullets don't bump up from pressure and they are typically .001" smaller to start with, lots of pressure escapes around a jacketed bullet when it is still in the throat. Lead bullets seal better so there is very little pressure loss.

Look in any reputable reloading manual and you'll see the same exact powder charge with the same weight bullets, lead bullets will have a higher velocity than jacketed and the max pressure load will use less powder with lead.
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Old December 30th, 2009, 09:49 AM   #10
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iowegan View Post
mobius, Yes, that's right. Lots of myths in reloading and this is one of them. Both jacketed and lead bullets move out of the case at the same rate ... it's purely a product of weight vs pressure. Because jacketed bullets don't bump up from pressure and they are typically .001" smaller to start with, lots of pressure escapes around a jacketed bullet when it is still in the throat. Lead bullets seal better so there is very little pressure loss.

Look in any reputable reloading manual and you'll see the same exact powder charge with the same weight bullets, lead bullets will have a higher velocity than jacketed and the max pressure load will use less powder with lead.
If I can ask another non expert question
Is this why Glock recommends not shooting lead bullets.
I have often wondered why as I see that mentioned whenever one goes kaboom
Thanks
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Old December 30th, 2009, 10:22 AM   #11
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I thought Glocks were no reloads at all? Something about how they headspace??? I don't own one so never worried about it or paid much attention.
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Old December 30th, 2009, 11:46 AM   #12
 
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Couple of issues with Glocks. First is their polygonal barrel, and the theory (or myth) is that lead bullets either have more friction or leave more lead in the rifling, either of which creates excessive chamber pressure. I've heard some people say this is misinformation, though.

The real issue that worries me with Glocks and reloads is how the case head is unsupported in the chamber. There's a large portion of the case head that has no support (behind the barrel ramp), and when you're talking about a high pressure 9mm or .40 S&W, that creates a fatigue point in the case. In fact, there was a post recently on the m1911.org forum where one of the members had some 9mm reloads burst at this exact same spot when he fired them out of his Colt Commander. The general consensus was that the "once fired" brass he'd picked up was probably shot out of Glocks (police range), and all of the cases burst at this fatigued area of the case that is unsupported in the Glock pistols.
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Old December 30th, 2009, 01:29 PM   #13
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It's not just Glocks. Most all 40 S&Ws and 9mm (including Rugers) with built-in feed ramps have unsupported chambers to some extent. Glocks seem to be worse than others. Here how to test for an unsupported chamber: First, make a cutaway case like in the second photo with a spent primer to plug the flash hole. Insert the case fully into the chamber where the cutaway section is aligned with the feed ramp. Shine a light in the muzzle. If you can see light emanating from the feed ramp, your chamber does not fully support the case.

This picture is a 40 S&W Beretta Mod 96 barrel. As you can see, blue light from an LED in the muzzle is emanating from the ramp area. The larger the unsupported area, the more likely a case will blow out, especially reloads when the weak area just happens to align with the feed ramp. Note: the barrel is upside down.





Lead bullets can be safely fired in a 40 S&W Glock, providing the bullets are the right hardness. Because 40 S&Ws run about 35k psi, you need a BHN 25 bullet (35,000/1400=25). Most hard cast bullets are in the range of BHN 20, which is too soft and will foul the bore badly. Once fouling builds up, pressure can increase to a point where a Kaboom can happen.

Last edited by Iowegan; December 30th, 2009 at 01:36 PM.
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Old December 31st, 2009, 08:00 AM   #14
 
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Thanks Iowagan for the explanation that is easy to understand, especially with the pictures.

I see you mention .40 cal and 9mm, would .357 sig be included since its a necked down .40? Also is the .45 case somehow better supported in the glock barrels than other calibers?

Thanks for your advice in 2009 and Happy New Year.
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Old December 31st, 2009, 10:25 AM   #15
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DILLIGAS, The non-supported case issue is mostly caused by a built-in feed ramp. Of course guns like 1911s with a partial feed ramp cut into the chamber mouth could also be a candidate if the mouth is cut back too far. Note the above cutaway case. The head is solid brass, which will never blow out. The thinner walls of the case are quite weak so if the walls are not well supported, you could get a blowout. Yes, a 357 Sig or 38 Super are also subject to problems with non-fully supported chambers.

Chamber pressures for the 9mm, 38 Super, and 40 S&W run about 35,000 psi. The 357 SIG goes up to 44k psi. The higher the chamber pressure, the more important chamber support becomes. 45 ACP chamber pressure is quite low (21k psi for standard and 23k psi for +P) so it is seldom a problem because the unsupported portion of the case will contain the pressure without expanding the brass.

That said, here's a picture of a 45 ACP case that was "hot loaded" and fired in a S&W pistol (not mine). The bulge resembles a "smile". Anytime you see a "smile" shaped bulge located where the case walls meet the solid head (any semi-auto case), it means the brass has expanded and weakened. Toss them in the trash. A sizing die will make the smile disappear but the case will still be weakened and could result in a blowout.

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