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Is K 1 kerosene = to K 1 kerosene?

This is a discussion on Is K 1 kerosene = to K 1 kerosene? within the Maintenance forums, part of the Firearm Forum category; I used to sell oil products and there was only one kerosene. K 1 was kerosene and K 2 was fuel oil/diesel fuel. Refining further ...


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Old July 24th, 2011, 04:48 PM   #1
 
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Is K 1 kerosene = to K 1 kerosene?

I used to sell oil products and there was only one kerosene. K 1 was kerosene and K 2 was fuel oil/diesel fuel. Refining further gets to gasoline. Now I use the pump K 1 for my space heater. When listening to a video of a guy mixing up the Ed's Red mixture, he says don't use the pump grade kerosene because it has acids in it not good for the gun. Use kerosene for oil lamps and space heaters sold in a can. Now both are called K 1. Is there any real difference or just another myth? If there was a difference it seems the product would be called something different or labeled as K 1 kerosene with "acids removed, ....." etc.



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Old July 25th, 2011, 11:08 AM   #2
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What you may be dealing with here is semantics. Some people, even some in the business, call several grades of fuel/heating oil kerosene. 1 K is 1 K and 2 K is 2 K but both as sometimes referred to as kerosene. The key for you is to use the grade that has the lower sulfur content and 1 K is that grade, regardless of how it is distributed. I believe the gentlemen in the video was probably thinking of 2 K associated with the “pump” grade kerosene but that’s speculation on my part.

The less refined grades, diesel and heating oil, contain more sulfur and require exhaust ducting when combusted. The grades designated for space heaters which exhaust into the heated space, have lower sulfur content. The sulfur, under certain conditions, can combine with oxygen to form sulfur dioxide gas (S02). The sulfur dioxide can then combine with water to form Sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Sulfur dioxide is a stack gas usually only generated by combustion of the fuel so the “acidity” of kerosene is probably not that much different in the two grades mentioned. The 1 K grade with lower sulfur is the better choice and it shouldn’t matter how it is distributed if the distribution equipment is clean of contaminants.
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Old July 25th, 2011, 01:12 PM   #3
 
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Thanks BronxB. I see deodorized 1 K is also recommended. So is all of our 1 K deodorized or is there some that is and some that is not? I am assuming all 1 K kerosene is deordorized but I want to understand this issue for my own knowledge plus the effect on my guns. In my chemistry class we had to be specifically correct in the stuff we mixed! lol I used to buy lacquor thinner from a pump at the local parts house. Same thinner as in the can but I saved some money bringing my own five gal. can.
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Old July 25th, 2011, 01:51 PM   #4
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The term “deodorized” is misleading. When indicated by the label, 1 K kerosene meets the requirements of ASTM D3699-08 which means it is a fairly pure petroleum distillate with small percentages of anti-oxidants and it burns “smokeless” and “Odorless!” There are many other attributes specified in the document but these are the key ones for our discussion.

That’s why many are afraid of pumped chemicals; they feel they can never be sure if it’s what it is claimed to be or some counterfeit chemical. As a heating fuel, 1 K grade kerosene is specified for use in confined areas and in equipment that exhausts into the area. It has, by nature of the chemical, low odor before and after ignition. I don’t say it doesn’t exist but I am not familiar with kerosene that is deodorized. Yet, I am well aware of kerosene that has had odors added for safety reasons.

The bottom line… a good quality 1 K kerosene will not be harmful to metals used in firearm manufacturing. Be very careful, however, on how you apply it or any formulas made with it to plastic, rubber and most woods and wood finishes. It can and sometimes will attack some synthetic materials and standard finish coatings.
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Old July 25th, 2011, 02:28 PM   #5
 
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Thank you Sir. Good feedback. Check is in the mail!
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Old July 25th, 2011, 02:41 PM   #6
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Quote:
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Thank you Sir. Good feedback. Check is in the mail!
You're welcome. Thank you. Don't I wish!
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