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bad to close action with slide stop?

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Old March 7th, 2017, 05:24 AM   #1
 
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bad to close action with slide stop?

So I almost always use the slide release when chambering a round, but I've always been told when not chambering a round to ease the slide home without dropping it... the reasoning was presumably wear and tear? So is it bad for the gun to use the slide release when you're not chambering a round? Why or why not?



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Old March 7th, 2017, 05:34 AM   #2
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I was always taught to ease the slide shut on automatics unless chambering a round to prevent excessive wear on the gun. The chambering of the round slows the movement of the slide so that it is not as much of a hammering effect on the gun. Other than S&W regarding their M&P series of auto pistols, I'm not aware of any other mfg that says to sling shot the slide vs using the slide release/stop to drop the slide when chambering a bullet. I've always used the slide release on every automatic I've owned to drop the slide when chambering a round with no ill effects.

On another note, one should never wrist flip a revolver cylinder shut as seen on TV.
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Old March 7th, 2017, 06:19 AM   #3
 
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In blacksmithing, if you miss your work and hit the anvil with your hammer, you can chip the hammer and anvil. This holds true of any hardened steel surfaces.

I've never heard of the concept of riding the slide home on an empty chamber to avoid damage or excessive wear and tear, but it seems there is at least some logic that can be applied to it, and now that I've heard of this concept I'll likely be a bit more gentle. But I rarely ever close a slide on an empty chamber. An unloaded gun is an expensive paperweight.

I rarely use the slide stop to release any slide for one reason: muscle memory. Different makes and models have different shapes and sizes, usually in slightly different locations and usually take different amounts of force to disengage. If I ALWAYS release the slide with a rearward tug, wrapping my hand over the top, then I'll ALWAYS be able to do a speedy reload in a dire situation rather than fumbling around with a slide stop. The stop on my FNS is stiff, the one on my LC9s is miniscule, stiff, and almost impossible for me to release, and on some guns I simply can't reach them. Govt model 1911s unless equipped with an extended slide release and most full sized Sigs immediately come to mind. When I do use the slide stop, I can't recall a time that it hasn't been in tandem with a rearward tug, because it's when I'm releasing a slide with an unloaded mag inserted.

Last edited by SteelHorseCowboy; March 7th, 2017 at 06:23 AM.
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Old March 7th, 2017, 07:05 AM   #4
 
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Using the slide lock to chamber a round might cause some wear to the slide lock. And, not all autos have an easy to manipulate slide lock/release. Some are dang near impossible.

On an empty chamber, I don't let the slide fly home, but rather, ease it closed. Don't know why, it just seems natural. I don't think a few times would hurt it.
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Old March 7th, 2017, 08:13 AM   #5
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BossHog View Post
So I almost always use the slide release when chambering a round, but I've always been told when not chambering a round to ease the slide home without dropping it... the reasoning was presumably wear and tear? So is it bad for the gun to use the slide release when you're not chambering a round? Why or why not?
I have a rule I go by when first using a new firearm. Sit down and read the manual first. If it says it is a slide stop, continue reading and see what they recommend to load the pistol (Ruger, at least with the marks and 22/45) says to pull back the slide and release. Then of course clean it before going to fire for the first time.

With my 22/45, even following this concept fully, I recently had to replace slide stop at about 3000 rounds. This presented itself as the slide did not hold open on last shot. So, I would not have expected that to happen that soon and was slightly disappointed.
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Old March 7th, 2017, 08:51 AM   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulkalman View Post
I have a rule I go by when first using a new firearm. Sit down and read the manual first. If it says it is a slide stop, continue reading and see what they recommend to load the pistol (Ruger, at least with the marks and 22/45) says to pull back the slide and release. Then of course clean it before going to fire for the first time.

With my 22/45, even following this concept fully, I recently had to replace slide stop at about 3000 rounds. This presented itself as the slide did not hold open on last shot. So, I would not have expected that to happen that soon and was slightly disappointed.
really, I do either to chamber a round... the Q is more about why/validity of not releasing slide without stripping round... BTW my 22/45 is pretty miserable little gun if it's a Mark 3 you probably wore something out with the brutal cleaning process
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Old March 7th, 2017, 09:16 AM   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulkalman View Post
I have a rule I go by when first using a new firearm. Sit down and read the manual first. If it says it is a slide stop, continue reading and see what they recommend to load the pistol (Ruger, at least with the marks and 22/45) says to pull back the slide and release. Then of course clean it before going to fire for the first time...
Yes, the manual will have details on slide stop vs slide release. On virtually all 1911-style and the older third-gen S&W semi-autos (all-metal construction), it is a slide release. On the .22 Ruger Mark II and up pistols, it is a slide stop. Most defensive pistol instructors/schools teach to use the lever as a slide release when reloading. I rarely let a semi-auto slide/bolt slam home on an empty chamber. When changing magazines, I use my left thumb (non-shooting hand) to release the slide, as I don't have a 4 inch long thumb on my shooting hand (!) I also usually stay away from 'extended' anything on a firearm that might be used in a defensive role, as they may contribute to snagging or inadvertent operation.

And on the first-time cleaning: detail strip the gun at least as far as the manual indicates. Then clean, lube, and reassemble. I prefer to completely strip the entire new gun down to fully clean out the internals, but then I have a plethora of gunsmithing/disassembly reference literature and 30 years of experience to back it up.
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Old March 7th, 2017, 10:58 AM   #8
 
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I wonder who comes up with these paranoid delusions ???

LOL

Maybe someone is, or knows, a military armorer that can answer this better.

As a part of "manual of arms" you lock bolt/slide to rear, inspect chamber....... then last step is releasing bolt to SLAM home.
You DO NOT "ride" the bolt/slide forward.

I have NEVER even heard of a quality firearm "chipping" in any way from properly releasing slide/bolt into battery on an empty (or loaded) chamber.

But I do know that some people can tear up an anvil with a biscuit.
And I know some of them well.
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Old March 7th, 2017, 11:54 AM   #9
 
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I pull the slide to the rear and let it go to load a round. I do not use the slide release.

But let me ask you. You ride the slide forward to ease wear and tear. But what happens when you pull the trigger? The slide moves all the way to the rear until it stops and then the spring sends it back home. It doesn't ease it. It uses the spring tension. It's what it is designed to do.

Easing the slide forward only slows down the speed the bullet moves into the chamber, increasing chance of round not loading correctly or not going into battery
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Old March 7th, 2017, 11:57 AM   #10
 
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Sorry. I read that wrong. On an empty chamber I do not slam it shut. And I don't like releasing by slide lock. I just don't like it.
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Old March 7th, 2017, 02:23 PM   #11
 
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I always use the slide release on my Gold Cup, provided the mag is loaded. I never release it and let it slam on an empty mag.

There is a little resistance on the slide when you have a loaded mag, resistance picking up the bullet, resistance on the feed ramp and resistance going into the chamber.

I've heard of extractors breaking, stress being put on the slide pin and wear on the barrel lugs from dropping a slide with no round in the chamber. I 've also seen guns where after time the slide to frame fit was a sloppy, was that the culprit, maybe, I don't know.

Can anyone name one good reason why you'd want to drop a slide on an empty chamber?



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Old March 7th, 2017, 04:37 PM   #12
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by medicineman View Post
I wonder who comes up with these paranoid delusions ???

LOL

Maybe someone is, or knows, a military armorer that can answer this better.

As a part of "manual of arms" you lock bolt/slide to rear, inspect chamber....... then last step is releasing bolt to SLAM home.
You DO NOT "ride" the bolt/slide forward.

I have NEVER even heard of a quality firearm "chipping" in any way from properly releasing slide/bolt into battery on an empty (or loaded) chamber.

But I do know that some people can tear up an anvil with a biscuit.
And I know some of them well.
I was simply pointing out that someone, somewhere, may have used the anvil/hammer reasoning as their logic for coming up with this idea. First thing I thought of when I read that first post was the manual of arms I was taught in the Marines. No one ever said anything about riding the slide home on an empty chamber, we always let it slam shut no matter what it was. And the military's weapons are no more robust that civilian firearms. So, no, I doubt that chipping is one of those things that will ever happen. But let me ask you this: if you're not in the military and not doing inspection arms, is there any harm in riding the slide or bolt home on an empty chamber? I didn't think so.

On biscuits and anvils, I've seen biscuits that could be used as anvils. So neener neener neener

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark204 View Post
I always use the slide release on my Gold Cup, provided the mag is loaded. I never release it and let it slam on an empty mag.

There is a little resistance on the slide when you have a loaded mag, resistance picking up the bullet, resistance on the feed ramp and resistance going into the chamber.

I've heard of extractors breaking, stress being put on the slide pin and wear on the barrel lugs from dropping a slide with no round in the chamber. I 've also seen guns where after time the slide to frame fit was a sloppy, was that the culprit, maybe, I don't know.

Can anyone name one good reason why you'd want to drop a slide on an empty chamber?



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I've seen internal extractors on 1911s break when the slide is allowed to slam home on an already loaded chamber. As in, a round not fed by the slide, but dropped into the chamber and then the slide allowed to slam shut.
The Beretta M9 is designed to be loaded single rounds in a pinch, such as if the magazine is lost. That's part of the reason for their open top slide design, to make doing so easier. But I've never known anyone who was willing to count how many rounds it took to break the extractor. Lock slide, load round, fire. Lock slide, load round, fire... that'd make a hella long range day. And Beretta offers no real guidance on how much of that abuse it can take.
A general guideline I follow is, an internal extractor can break the first time you do it, external extractors seem to have a bit more give, but it's not a good idea to do it with either.

I've never heard of an extractor breaking on an empty chamber. I suppose there could be guns out there that the extractor can slam into steel if there's not a round in the chamber, but not one I'm familiar with. I don't think lugs and linkages would suffer anymore wear and tear than when firing.
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Old March 7th, 2017, 05:50 PM   #13
 
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My BIL always slammed the slide of his 1911 home on an empty chamber. I told him a few times I thought that could damage the extractor. He didn't listen and the extractor doesn't work any more. But his gun his problem.
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Old March 7th, 2017, 06:03 PM   #14
 
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That's good to know.
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Old March 7th, 2017, 06:53 PM   #15
 
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I have always ride the on an empty chamber just out of common sense, I was never told to do so. Nothing said would make me drop the slide on an empty chamber. Do what you feel.
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