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Wheel Bearing Grease

This is a discussion on Wheel Bearing Grease within the Maintenance forums, part of the Firearm Forum category; I came across this 2008 YouTube video, in which the presenter recommends using automotive wheel bearing grease to lubricate a semi-auto. Granted, he is referencing ...


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Old December 8th, 2016, 01:29 PM   #1
 
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Wheel Bearing Grease

I came across this 2008 YouTube video, in which the presenter recommends using automotive wheel bearing grease to lubricate a semi-auto. Granted, he is referencing a Glock, but the basics are the same.

https://youtu.be/D2LbUN2esXU

Does anyone here use wheel bearing grease? Pros and cons?

It seems like it should work, but I'd like the opinions of those more knowledgeable than me.

Thanks

Pam



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Old December 8th, 2016, 02:05 PM   #2
 
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It's okay for summer/southern use but gets rather stiff in cold weather. For reliability purposes I would stick to lighter lubes.
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Old December 8th, 2016, 02:13 PM   #3
 
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"wheel bearing grease" could mean a lot of things to a lot of people.

Personally I think most wheel bearing grease would be a bit heavy (viscous, thick, etc.) for use on a semi-auto slide rail, particularly in cold weather.

Whenever gun lubrication comes up, I like to reference this article:

Lubrication 101: Gun oil, snake oil, and how to tell the difference. - www.GrantCunningham.com www.GrantCunningham.com
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Old December 8th, 2016, 02:23 PM   #4
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i just use the spray lube in my Hoppes cleaning kits...

i would think a lithium based grease would be pretty good... but then again, how about Slick 50... or the other PTFE products.
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Old December 8th, 2016, 03:18 PM   #5
 
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The demands on the lubricants used for firearms are not that great.
There's an awful lot of "Snake Oil" lore out there.

Everyone has their own pet firearm oil or grease. Most work pretty well, some don't work well at all and some work a little better than others.

I've seen guns that were cleaned with nothing but kerosene and lubricated with nothing but 3 in 1 oil for more than 60 years that survived just fine.

Automatic Transmission Fluid [ATF] works amazingly well and 1 inexpensive quart will last a Loooooooong time.

I've used a lot of difference products over the years and still maintain a small collection of products to take care of my firearms.

For most cleaning duties I use Kroil or Hoppes #9.
For lubrication I rely on white lithium grease or Clenzoil.
For short term rust prevention it's Clenzoil.
For longer term rust prevention I trust RIG. I'm sure there are newer products but it has never failed me.

None of the above is Holy Writ.
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Old December 8th, 2016, 03:31 PM   #6
 
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I do use synthetic, high-temp, wheel bearing grease.
A thin film on friction surfaces.
Never had a problem.
Works great on wheel bearings too.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
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Old December 8th, 2016, 04:03 PM   #7
 
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It has extended my filter and oil changes by 5000 rounds.
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Old December 8th, 2016, 04:52 PM   #8
 
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I use hi temp carbon fiber grease on my guns.
I also use regular car motor oil.

Carbon fiber grease is very fine, will stick where ever you put it, and will help with stiff DA triggers.
You can wipe it on with a toothbrush, then wipe if back off with a clean rag. Its all but impossible to totally wipe it all back off since its so fine. It will still leave a very light coating on the gun. I wouldnt cake it on or anything. And it will stiffen up in the cold, so you gotta be careful about using it on your EDC slide if you carry an auto in winter. I mostly use motor oil in winter.

I also will use just about any kind of grease for storage. Rifles, etc, that I know I wont be using for a while always get a good coat with a toothbrush. I DONT wipe it off with a rag. . I just leave on heavy. And I run a coat through the bore and leave it in the bore heavy also.

Recently I gave my step son a 22 rifle that was his NIB when he was a kid. About 20 years ago I coated it in grease, wrapped it in newspaper, put it in the box, and stored it in a closet. When we gave it back to him last year, it was as spotless as the day he got it new.
WD 40 will help loosen the grease up so it wipes right off. Just spray it with WD40, let it soak a few minutes, & the grease will liquify and wipe right off. It took him about a 1/2 hour to clean his 22,, but good as new.

Most grease has an odor, so be careful with it on your hunting rifle .

Grease is great, if used with common sense.

EDIT TO ADD,,

FYI,, WD40 is NOT a lubricant. WD stands fot "water displacement". It may lubricate a little when first applied, but it evaporates. It does however help clean/strip old oil off. Just like using it to strip grease off. I use WD40 alot for cleaning a weapon, but always wipe it back down with motor oil afterwards.

Last edited by DCD327; December 8th, 2016 at 05:00 PM.
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Old December 8th, 2016, 05:10 PM   #9
 
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IMO, wheel bearing grease might lend problems in colder conditions but it is thick enough to stay put. If it is a synthetic grease I cannot say it would not work. In fact it may do really good.

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Old December 8th, 2016, 07:55 PM   #10
 
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I use a little bit of Mobil-1 red synthetic WB grease on the rails of my two 1911's. Heck, I use it on the rails of my Sig Mosquito as well. I use a syringe to apply a tiny bead to the corners of the rail grooves, and manually cycle the slide a dozen or so times when everything is back together before wiping down the excess. I want to have enough to maintain a decent film, but not so much that it's damping the action of the slide. That the Mosquito tolerates it pretty well tells me that I'm not overdoing it. I have not yet used it on the MKII bolt, but I have used it on the 10/22 bolt. Seems to be OK there, too.

I also use a lighter oil on the small parts that need to move freely - extractor bits, firing pin, pivots & pins where loads are low but some lube is needed. I have no science behind this, other than generally trying to put the grease where the loads are high, or where I want the lube to stay put while being stored. The grease is cheap, readily available, and does no harm if the weapon cycles properly, but that's all I can tell you about it. Off to read the link posted above...

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Old December 9th, 2016, 04:52 AM   #11
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Gun lubrication .... every since our first encounter with guns, most of us were taught by our mentors .... fathers, grandfathers, drill sergeants, fellow shooters, and virtually any one else in a position of authority to oil and grease our guns .... more is better.

In my 31 years in the gunsmith business, I would estimate more than 50% of the guns that came in my shop for repairs were related to excessive oil or grease. Between what I learned in gunsmith school and my personnel experiences, people tend to use way more oil than needed and there is never a situation where grease is needed in any handgun.

What's the mission of maintaining our firearms? The first mission is to make our firearms reliable, especially if they are used for self defense or even hunting. The second mission is to make them last as long as possible. As it turns out, some preventative maintenance procedures cause less reliability and more wear than if no preventative maintenance was done at all. So ... we don't want to be counterproductive but our training from mentors tends to make us that way.

Many people compare guns with other mechanical devices like cars or farm machinery. Things like axil bearings are used to support several tons of pressure. They are also sealed from outside dirt and grime. Oil in internal combustion engines is in a sealed system that uses a pump to distribute oil to parts that are subject to wear from very high temperatures and high tension areas such as pistons. These parts can be exposed to thousands of pounds of surface tension. In any revolver, pistol, or rifle, you would be hard pressed to find any friction surface with more than 25 lbs of tension .... in fact just a couple pounds is more common ..... a far cry from thousands of pounds of tension or high temperatures found in other mechanical devices. Besides very low friction levels, guns have an issue that is NOT common in other mechanical devices and that is powder residue. When oil and powder residue mix, it produces a very abrasive "sludge" that will wear parts much faster than if there was no oil at all. Oil will also turn gummy with time .... as little as a couple months and will actually reverse rolls ... especially when temperatures drop. This results in an increase in friction rather than reduction.

Take some advised from an old gunsmith. Start by using gun products on guns and save automotive or household products for their specific tasks. Gun oils are specifically designed to migrate on parts so the entire part becomes coated whereas automotive products are just too thick and don't migrate well. The single biggest thing to avoid is running your gun "wet". When a part is properly lubricated, it should feel dry ... never wet or greasy because this will attract powder residue, which is mostly very abrasive carbon particles. What I recommend is a good periodic cleaning then put a dot of oil on each part and use a clean patch to distribute the oil until it feels dry. This will apply plenty of protection for rust and will reduce friction .... but it won't cause powder residue to accumulate.

Testimonial .... I had many customers that participated in shooting sports. After I taught them how to clean and lubricate their guns, their frequent malfunctions dropped to near zero. Further, their guns would out last their competitors that used too much oil. In my own specific situation .... I bought a brand new Colt Series 70 1911 45 ACP, a S&W Mod 14 38 Special revolver, and a S&W Mod 41 22 LR pistol when I began shooting NRA bullseye matches back in the late 70's. I always cleaned my guns after each shooting session and applied a very tiny amount of gun oil, then disbursed with a patch and wiped off any excess. My guns always felt dry. I logged more than 50,000 rounds of hardball through my 1911. I still own it but finally did replace the barrel a few years ago because it looked like a smooth bore .... virtually no rifling. This was not an "oil issue" rather it was just a matter of running so much full power jacketed ammo down the pipe. This gun shows very little wear .... the slide is still snug and it still functions perfect. My K-frame 38 only logged about 25,000 rounds but still worked perfect. I ended up selling it and my S&W Mod 41 to a friend when I quit shooting. I can't begin to count the number of 22 LRs that passed through that Mod 41 .... it had to be well over 100,000 and the gun still looked and worked like a new one. Point is .... with minimal oil and no grease, these guns held up fantastic. I could count the total number of malfunctions for all three guns on my two hands which is also fantastic considering 5 years of punishing use.

As usual .... your gun, your money, your life potentially at risk so do as you please.
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Old December 9th, 2016, 05:52 AM   #12
 
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I believe Iowegan's approach is the best bet.
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Old December 9th, 2016, 07:32 AM   #13
 
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Old December 9th, 2016, 08:25 AM   #14
 
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Old December 9th, 2016, 09:45 AM   #15
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petrol and Powder View Post
...Automatic Transmission Fluid [ATF] works amazingly well and 1 inexpensive quart will last a Loooooooong time...
ATF is not a very good substance to use for gun lubrication. First, it stains. It is foremost a hydraulic fluid, with some lubricating properties and a bunch of additives that are not needed for firearms lubrication. Finally, it has toxic properties and skin contact with it should be avoided.

As for motor oil as a firearms lubricant, it has a bunch of additives that are not needed, and skin contact should generally be avoided.

There are many specific firearms lubricants available that are better overall than ATF and motor oil.
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