f> Wheel Bearing Grease - Page 2 - Ruger Forum

Ruger Forum

Wheel Bearing Grease

This is a discussion on Wheel Bearing Grease within the Maintenance forums, part of the Firearm Forum category; Originally Posted by firescout ATF is not a very good substance to use for gun lubrication. First, it stains. It is foremost a hydraulic fluid, ...


Go Back   Ruger Forum > Firearm Forum > Maintenance

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes

Old December 10th, 2016, 10:59 AM   #16
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Virginia
Posts: 999
Petrol and Powder has a spectacular aura aboutPetrol and Powder has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by firescout View Post
ATF is not a very good substance to use for gun lubrication. First, it stains. It is foremost a hydraulic fluid, with some lubricating properties and a bunch of additives that are not needed for firearms lubrication. Finally, it has toxic properties and skin contact with it should be avoided.

As for motor oil as a firearms lubricant, it has a bunch of additives that are not needed, and skin contact should generally be avoided.

There are many specific firearms lubricants available that are better overall than ATF and motor oil.
Well I don't currently use ATF but I have in the past. It is basically 10W oil with some additives to make it suitable for automatic transmissions. It's thin enough to work on a firearm and cheap enough that I didn't care about the fact that it could stain a few things. You use so little of it that it really was a non-issue.

And I'm not the only person to think ATF has some value:
Lubrication 101: Gun oil, snake oil, and how to tell the difference. - www.GrantCunningham.com www.GrantCunningham.com


Having spent some time as a mechanic, I think I got far more exposure to motor oil, diesel, gasoline, mineral spirits, grease, gear lube, anti-freeze, ATF and other petro chemicals that I didn't worry too much about a drop of ATF on a gun.

I will say that there's nothing magical about specialized gun lubricants other than the fact that they are stupid expensive. I'm not convinced that specific firearms lubricants are "a lot better".

Clenzoil, Kroil and RIG are pretty much my current main stays. Even those products cost more than they should and they're fairly run-of-the-mill as firearms products go.

I will agree that when it come to lubricating a firearm, less is more.



Petrol and Powder is offline  
Advertisements
Old December 10th, 2016, 11:35 AM   #17
 
gqucool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Utah
Posts: 7,708
gqucool is just really nicegqucool is just really nicegqucool is just really nicegqucool is just really nice
There is a very good grease thats a lighter in composition as compared to wheel grease and its called Millitec grease thats what I use on my semi-auto's and the actions of my rifles etc.
gqucool is online now  
Old December 10th, 2016, 11:46 AM   #18
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: N. Calif
Posts: 2,393
firescout will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petrol and Powder View Post
Well I don't currently use ATF but I have in the past. It is basically 10W oil with some additives to make it suitable for automatic transmissions. It's thin enough to work on a firearm and cheap enolugh that I didn't care about the fact that it could stain a few things. You use so little of it that it really was a non-issue.

And I'm not the only person to think ATF has some value:
Lubrication 101: Gun oil, snake oil, and how to tell the difference. - www.GrantCunningham.com www.GrantCunningham.com


Having spent some time as a mechanic, I think I got far more exposure to motor oil, diesel, gasoline, mineral spirits, grease, gear lube, anti-freeze, ATF and other petro chemicals that I didn't worry too much about a drop of ATF on a gun.

I will say that there's nothing magical about specialized gun lubricants other than the fact that they are stupid expensive. I'm not convinced that specific firearms lubricants are "a lot better".

Clenzoil, Kroil and RIG are pretty much my current main stays. Even those products cost more than they should and they're fairly run-of-the-mill as firearms products go.

I will agree that when it come to lubricating a firearm, less is more.
You may not think much of staining your things with ATF, but maybe other people do?

Just because you've exposed yourself to a number of chemicals and somewhat toxic substances over the years doesn't mean that someone that hasn't should start, by using ATF on their firearms.

If you carefully read Grant Cunningham's writings, he states that he no longer recommends using ATF due to its toxic properties.

Many gun lubes such as Hoppe's and Ballistol are a mineral oil base. Pretty basic. Some are a synthetic base stock, which is also pretty basic. I enjoy the variety of gun lubes that are available. Some apply wet, and then leave a dry film, while others remain wet. Some act as cleaners, and some are better at preventing corrosion. Some purport themselves to be non-toxic or non-petroleum based.

I don't find most gun lubes to be 'stupid expensive' (what exactly does that mean?). I still have a few bottles from the 1980s, such as BreakFree CLP and Hoppes oil, so I think that with whatever they cost me back then, I've gotten my money's worth. Do most gun owners use a quart of gun lube every year? I don't think so.

At the end, you state 'less is more' when it comes to lubricating guns. With that, I think that a small bottle of gun lube will last most people a decade or more. For the most part, keeping a gun's action consistantly clean is key in preventing excessive wear. A small amount of the proper lubricant in the correct locations adds to the protection.
firescout is offline  
 
Old December 10th, 2016, 12:23 PM   #19
 
kwalter219's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: northwest Indiana
Posts: 73
kwalter219 is on a distinguished road
I have been in the automotive field for my whole life, and still have not found the wheel bearings on any of my firearms. Yet they all seem to function perfectly as designed. Simple lubrication for simple basic designs, and very little is needed.
kwalter219 is offline  
Old December 10th, 2016, 01:44 PM   #20
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Virginia
Posts: 999
Petrol and Powder has a spectacular aura aboutPetrol and Powder has a spectacular aura about
I did read Grant Cunningham's article closely and I did see that he no longer recommends ATF.

I also DO NOT CARE about the toxicity of three drops of ATF on a gun. Somehow I think other things are going to kill me long before that tiny bit of ATF does. The staining part could be an issue if one were to slather ATF on the gun as if it was BBQ sauce but I never had a problem back in the days I was using it. Probably because I used it very sparingly like I do most gun lubricants.

I've used my share of Breakfree, Hoppes gun oil, Snake Oil (yes, it's a real product) and probably dozens of others that I can't recall right now.
$5.00 for a 4 ounce plastic bottle of oil doesn't compare favorably to $3.00 for a 32 ounce (quart) bottle of no name ATF at Walmart. That's what I mean by stupid expensive. I'm willing to bet that Rem Oil, Hoppes Gun Oil (which is suspiciously similar to 3 in 1 oil), Breakfree or some others; don't really cost $40 a Quart to manufacture.

Now, I understand that 4 Ounces, or even 2 ounces, of gun oil will last a Longgggggg time but the equivalent of $40 a quart or $160 a gallon is what I mean when I say it's "Stupid Expensive".

Now, in the vast scheme of gun related costs, a little bit of oil isn't a deal breaker. But I firmly believe that gun care products are heavy on marketing and light on actual value.

Just because "gun oil" is expensive doesn't mean that it's spectacular.
Petrol and Powder is offline  
Old December 10th, 2016, 01:50 PM   #21
 
rojasj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 252
rojasj is on a distinguished road
I have to agree 100% with Iowegan on this. I've been down the road of what lube to use, how much and when. I've also come to the conclusion from both experience and wisdom that less is more. I'm now down to not putting oil on the gun directly after I clean it. Rather, I put a drop or two on a patch and very lightly pass the oily patch over any areas the show wear marks. I let it sit for a bit and then gently wipe any excessive oil sheen off the gun. I used to put way more lube on my guns than that and as Iowegan said they would create a sludge that was simply carbon and oil.

I have a thread on here regrading winter lube and so far the process above has worked for me and cured the cold temperature issue I was experiencing.
rojasj is offline  
Old December 10th, 2016, 02:27 PM   #22
Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
 
Iowegan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: CB, IA
Posts: 11,630
Iowegan is a name known to allIowegan is a name known to allIowegan is a name known to allIowegan is a name known to allIowegan is a name known to allIowegan is a name known to all

Awards Showcase

Petrol and Powder, Sometimes things just get out of perspective. I own a large number of firearms worth quite a few bucks. About every 6 months, I empty my safes and spend a couple days doing preventative maintenance. Each gun gets a "once over" which includes a field strip, internal parts and frame get cleaned with Hoppie's #9, components are then very sparingly oiled, wiped down, and reassembled. Every time I go shooting, I clean all the guns I fired. I buy Hoppie's or Outer's gun oil (same exact stuff) in a 2 1/4 oz bottle (about $2.50 the last time I bought it). Unless I spill .... a 2 1/4 oz bottle will last me at least a year or account for about 300 cleanings. I think that's pretty cheap insurance! Further, actual gun oil (many different brands) are formulated specifically for guns and it works exceptionally well for me. I haven't seen a dot of rust on any of my guns nor have I experienced any wear issues. I look at it this way .... if I can't afford to spend a couple bucks a year on gun oil that does a fine job on a large number of guns, I should probably sell all of my guns. BTW, my guns are stored in safes located in my basement. Iowa is known for high humidity in the summer and condensation in the winter .... especially in basements so keeping the surfaces of my guns protected is just as important as keeping the internal parts protected. I don't think there are too many people more "picky" about their guns than me. When I take a gun out of my safe. I fully expect it to look brand new .... inside and out. Life is too short to deal with anything less.
Iowegan is offline  
Old December 10th, 2016, 04:18 PM   #23
 
opos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Where the debris meets the sea..America's finest Sanctuary City..
Posts: 5,562
opos has much to be proud ofopos has much to be proud ofopos has much to be proud ofopos has much to be proud ofopos has much to be proud ofopos has much to be proud ofopos has much to be proud ofopos has much to be proud ofopos has much to be proud ofopos has much to be proud of
I use a ton of wheel bearing grease....on wheel bearings! I use motor oil...in the crank case....I use 3 in one oil on the hinges and I use gun oil (one of several) on my guns...I do use some Kroil during cleaning depending on the situation but normally what I grew up with...Hoppe's #9 and gun oil...I do like CLP as well...I clean after every firing regardless of how few rounds get run....my guns are like new...I tear them down about each 6 months like Iowagian and give them a look and a wipe...my safe is in the garage..have a golden rod in it plus a couple of the little dry silica gel "stak on " units which I recharge about each month or two...not one problem ever...With me guns are a hobby and a pleasure...not a chore.
opos is offline  
Old December 10th, 2016, 04:25 PM   #24
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Virginia
Posts: 999
Petrol and Powder has a spectacular aura aboutPetrol and Powder has a spectacular aura about
My can of RIG is about 15 years old and I just reached the bottom of it. That was money well spent.

But I'm not convinced that every little bottle of gun oil is worth what it sells for.

It's not perspective. I understand that a little bottle that costs $5 and lasts 2 years isn't much money. It's the fact that the product in that bottle probably costs about $0.05 to make and another $0.05 to deliver and still make a profit. It's the other $4.90 that annoys me.
Petrol and Powder is offline  
Old December 10th, 2016, 06:00 PM   #25
 
laidlerj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Unoccupied Oregon
Posts: 5,310
laidlerj has much to be proud oflaidlerj has much to be proud oflaidlerj has much to be proud oflaidlerj has much to be proud oflaidlerj has much to be proud oflaidlerj has much to be proud oflaidlerj has much to be proud oflaidlerj has much to be proud oflaidlerj has much to be proud of
At the risk of censure from Iowegan, I'd mention that I occasionally use a dry bicycle chain lube (goes on wet and dries rapidly) for surfaces that need a little lubrication. Since it goes on wet, it's easy to apply; once it dries, it lubricates without attracting dirt and dust.

Yes, it's not a gun product (although it is similar to several dry lubes available for guns), but it is very effective for situations where dust and dirt is going to be a problem (shooting desert rats) or in extreme cold (it doesn't seize up in the cold).

Jim
laidlerj is offline  
Old December 10th, 2016, 06:20 PM   #26
 
Pampurrs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Arizona
Posts: 362
Pampurrs is on a distinguished road
Thanks for all the great feedback. The video I linked with the guy using wheel bearing grease on his gun raised my eyebrows, but I thought, "hey, this might work". I guess, based on the comments, it's not such a good idea after all.

I did read the Grant Cunningham lubrication article that Petrol and Powder posted. I hold a great deal of respect for Grant Cunningham, and take heed to his advice. I ordered a kit from Lubrikit and will try that.

As usual, this forum is a great source of information, education, and knowledge.

Pam
Pampurrs is offline  
Old December 11th, 2016, 04:45 AM   #27
 
rojasj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 252
rojasj is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by laidlerj View Post
At the risk of censure from Iowegan, I'd mention that I occasionally use a dry bicycle chain lube (goes on wet and dries rapidly) for surfaces that need a little lubrication. Since it goes on wet, it's easy to apply; once it dries, it lubricates without attracting dirt and dust.

Yes, it's not a gun product (although it is similar to several dry lubes available for guns), but it is very effective for situations where dust and dirt is going to be a problem (shooting desert rats) or in extreme cold (it doesn't seize up in the cold).

Jim
Finish Line or White Lighting ?
rojasj is offline  
Old December 11th, 2016, 08:36 AM   #28
Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
 
Iowegan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: CB, IA
Posts: 11,630
Iowegan is a name known to allIowegan is a name known to allIowegan is a name known to allIowegan is a name known to allIowegan is a name known to allIowegan is a name known to all

Awards Showcase

laidlerj, No censure from me. Your gun, do as you please. The reason why I went into the rant about oil and grease was to provide some information to those whom may not know some of the issues. If they choose to do something different, that's their prerogative.

I've never used dry bicycle chain lube for anything and didn't even know it existed until your post. Maybe it's the best thing since sliced bread .... maybe not. Meantime, I'll stick with my Hoppie's #9 and gun oil and get the same results I've gotten for more than 50 years. I'm happy if you're happy!
Iowegan is offline  
Old December 11th, 2016, 02:45 PM   #29
 
76Highboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Idaho
Posts: 533
76Highboy is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iowegan View Post
Gun lubrication .... every since our first encounter with guns, most of us were taught by our mentors .... fathers, grandfathers, drill sergeants, fellow shooters, and virtually any one else in a position of authority to oil and grease our guns .... more is better.

In my 31 years in the gunsmith business, I would estimate more than 50% of the guns that came in my shop for repairs were related to excessive oil or grease. Between what I learned in gunsmith school and my personnel experiences, people tend to use way more oil than needed and there is never a situation where grease is needed in any handgun.

What's the mission of maintaining our firearms? The first mission is to make our firearms reliable, especially if they are used for self defense or even hunting. The second mission is to make them last as long as possible. As it turns out, some preventative maintenance procedures cause less reliability and more wear than if no preventative maintenance was done at all. So ... we don't want to be counterproductive but our training from mentors tends to make us that way.

Many people compare guns with other mechanical devices like cars or farm machinery. Things like axil bearings are used to support several tons of pressure. They are also sealed from outside dirt and grime. Oil in internal combustion engines is in a sealed system that uses a pump to distribute oil to parts that are subject to wear from very high temperatures and high tension areas such as pistons. These parts can be exposed to thousands of pounds of surface tension. In any revolver, pistol, or rifle, you would be hard pressed to find any friction surface with more than 25 lbs of tension .... in fact just a couple pounds is more common ..... a far cry from thousands of pounds of tension or high temperatures found in other mechanical devices. Besides very low friction levels, guns have an issue that is NOT common in other mechanical devices and that is powder residue. When oil and powder residue mix, it produces a very abrasive "sludge" that will wear parts much faster than if there was no oil at all. Oil will also turn gummy with time .... as little as a couple months and will actually reverse rolls ... especially when temperatures drop. This results in an increase in friction rather than reduction.

Take some advised from an old gunsmith. Start by using gun products on guns and save automotive or household products for their specific tasks. Gun oils are specifically designed to migrate on parts so the entire part becomes coated whereas automotive products are just too thick and don't migrate well. The single biggest thing to avoid is running your gun "wet". When a part is properly lubricated, it should feel dry ... never wet or greasy because this will attract powder residue, which is mostly very abrasive carbon particles. What I recommend is a good periodic cleaning then put a dot of oil on each part and use a clean patch to distribute the oil until it feels dry. This will apply plenty of protection for rust and will reduce friction .... but it won't cause powder residue to accumulate.

Testimonial .... I had many customers that participated in shooting sports. After I taught them how to clean and lubricate their guns, their frequent malfunctions dropped to near zero. Further, their guns would out last their competitors that used too much oil. In my own specific situation .... I bought a brand new Colt Series 70 1911 45 ACP, a S&W Mod 14 38 Special revolver, and a S&W Mod 41 22 LR pistol when I began shooting NRA bullseye matches back in the late 70's. I always cleaned my guns after each shooting session and applied a very tiny amount of gun oil, then disbursed with a patch and wiped off any excess. My guns always felt dry. I logged more than 50,000 rounds of hardball through my 1911. I still own it but finally did replace the barrel a few years ago because it looked like a smooth bore .... virtually no rifling. This was not an "oil issue" rather it was just a matter of running so much full power jacketed ammo down the pipe. This gun shows very little wear .... the slide is still snug and it still functions perfect. My K-frame 38 only logged about 25,000 rounds but still worked perfect. I ended up selling it and my S&W Mod 41 to a friend when I quit shooting. I can't begin to count the number of 22 LRs that passed through that Mod 41 .... it had to be well over 100,000 and the gun still looked and worked like a new one. Point is .... with minimal oil and no grease, these guns held up fantastic. I could count the total number of malfunctions for all three guns on my two hands which is also fantastic considering 5 years of punishing use.

As usual .... your gun, your money, your life potentially at risk so do as you please.
I agree, IMO grease has no place on handguns. I know that some use it and I also agree that many use way too much oil. Great post.

Highboy
76Highboy is offline  
Old December 11th, 2016, 04:44 PM   #30
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: SC
Posts: 72
The Happy Kaboomer is on a distinguished road
Bear fat....vaseline.....ATF....motor oil.....castor oil.....1000's of things out there that will work.....Use what you like
The Happy Kaboomer is offline  
Reply

  Ruger Forum > Firearm Forum > Maintenance

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Ruger Forum Discussions
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Endshake Bearing? Longlosthiker Ruger Double Action 10 January 3rd, 2016 07:20 PM
end shake bearing?? old fart Ruger Double Action 0 September 25th, 2014 05:58 PM
my "Wheel" of wheel guns :) DoorKicker Gun Gallery 24 December 4th, 2013 04:07 AM
Endshake Bearing Life andyrping Ruger Double Action 5 August 29th, 2010 04:32 PM

Top Gun Sites Top Sites List
Powered by vBulletin 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright © 2006 - 2017 Ruger Forum. All rights reserved.
Ruger Forum is a Ruger Firearms enthusiast's forum, but it is in no way affiliated with, nor does it represent Sturm Ruger & Company Inc. of Southport, CT.