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Rust spots on a blued finish

This is a discussion on Rust spots on a blued finish within the Maintenance forums, part of the Firearm Forum category; I inherited a Ruger New Model Single Six 22 that has some rust spots on the barrell and other areas. The gun shoots well, but ...


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Old October 14th, 2009, 01:20 PM   #1
 
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Rust spots on a blued finish

I inherited a Ruger New Model Single Six 22 that has some rust spots on the barrell and other areas. The gun shoots well, but needs to be cleaned up. Please advise the best way to handle this, short of taking it in to be re-blued. I just ordered some EEZOX cleaner/lubricant yesterday based on another thread. Will it be of use in this situation as well?

Thanks,
Greg



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Old October 14th, 2009, 01:49 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glaurent View Post
I inherited a Ruger New Model Single Six 22 that has some rust spots on the barrell and other areas. The gun shoots well, but needs to be cleaned up. Please advise the best way to handle this, short of taking it in to be re-blued. I just ordered some EEZOX cleaner/lubricant yesterday based on another thread. Will it be of use in this situation as well?

Thanks,
Greg
First, you must accept the fact that all the protection achieved by the bluing has been compromised in the rusted areas. The EEZOX product is as good as any if you don’t have any major corrosion. If you do you would want to use a cutting oil and crocus cloth or very fine emery cloth. I was able to remove minor rust spotting on my 1911 components using a Dremel and a buffing wheel. It takes time to do it this way and lot’s of patience but it leaves whatever finish is still intact looking acceptable. I also used WD-40 lightly in the process to minimize abrasiveness. I don’t know the extent of your problem; mine was enough to make it a labor of love but I took a horrible looking gun and turned it into something that just looks old!

From that point forward you must be diligent about keeping a light coat of oil on the gun and wiping it down after each handling session. The EEZOX is excellent for this purpose and will be fine as a buffing lubricant if applied lightly. You can use the buffing wheel dry also or one of the wire or nylon brushes but the brush process takes more of the finish off.
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Old October 14th, 2009, 02:15 PM   #3
 
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If you want a little newer looking gun when you're all done, I suggest using some steel wool and oil, and lightly buff off the rust. You can use some light grit Emory cloth to sand out the pitting and then crocus cloth to buff it up. This will remove the old bluing in those spots...at that point, clean and degrease the spots you worked on, and use a quality cold blue like Oxphoblue to finish the now bear metal. Buff Lightly with steel wool to blend the old and new finish together, and it will look pretty good. It's work for sure, but you have to decide how much time and energy you want to put into any project.
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Old October 14th, 2009, 05:31 PM   #4
 
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Thanks for the help and info. I realize it will be a chore, but what do you do when it means something to you; probably, no certainly, more than it's actual cash value. Anyway, thank you very much.
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Old October 15th, 2009, 07:08 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glaurent View Post
I inherited a Ruger New Model Single Six 22 that has some rust spots on the barrell and other areas. The gun shoots well, but needs to be cleaned up. Please advise the best way to handle this, short of taking it in to be re-blued. I just ordered some EEZOX cleaner/lubricant yesterday based on another thread. Will it be of use in this situation as well?
[SIZE="4"]If it's a light surface rust, use a light oil such as 3 in 1, and 0000 steel wool.

If the surface has become pitted, more aggressive measures may be needed.[/SIZE]
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Old October 15th, 2009, 09:46 AM   #6
 
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Yessir, all depends on the extent of the "rust" ,surface, or builkd up can clean up as said above, we happen to use "bronze wool" and any good rust type oil, gently rub the spot, ,,,,if "pitted" then you have to be a bit more aggressive, maybe even use the edge of a REAL copper penny, to get at the pit...lots of old wives tales as to why this works, but we found it does at times,NOT every time.......as for any touch up of the "spot", we happen to rely on and use '44-40' works for us ,in more cases than the others.....follow the instructions of whichever you may decide to use.........
if way too many spots and /or that deep, then a refinish is called for...got to see the gun ,on a case by case virtue.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 03:40 PM   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glaurent View Post
I inherited a Ruger New Model Single Six 22 that has some rust spots on the barrell and other areas. The gun shoots well, but needs to be cleaned up. Please advise the best way to handle this, short of taking it in to be re-blued. I just ordered some EEZOX cleaner/lubricant yesterday based on another thread. Will it be of use in this situation as well?

Thanks,
Greg
I'm real sorry that I only just read this post! I recently discovered a way to get the rust off of a blued gun that does NOT, repeat NOT, harm the finish!! NO LIE. If you haven't taken crocus cloth or steel wool to it yet, DON'T!

I just bought a used Marlin 1894 levergun. As I looked it over, I noticed several pretty small, but pronounced rust patches on the receiver. The guy selling it said: "I can take those off so you'll never see them without damaging the bluing; so don't sweat them." I figured, "yeah, and cows fly, too", but said, "Oh really, how?" He showed me a pad of what looked like a silvery 'chore boy', if you know what that is. I asked him how that would not damage the finish. He replied that it was not "Steel wool, but 'aluminum wool'". OOOOOkay. Still worrying, since by this time I had bought the gun, he said he'd take them off for me. Before I could object, he grabbed this 'chore boy', and some oily liquid, and proceeded to scrub the rust off. Then he handed it to me, and there was NO SIGN OF RUST, and NO DAMAGE AT ALL to the bluing!!! I could not believe my eyes.

At the next gun show, we looked for this stuff, but all we could find was a coarse steel wool substance. A month later, we did find some of it, and asked if it was indeed aluminum. No, he said, it is 'monel'! Aha; that is why it is silvery, and NOT aluminum.

It is labeled "Big 45 Frontier metal cleaner" (rust and dirt remover), and made for "Big 45 Frontier Gun Shop in Hill City, South Dakota.

www.BIG45metalcleaner.com

I know this is the stuff he used, since he told me it was made in the Dakotas somewhere. It's not cheap, ($5.00 a pad), but it works.

I only wish I had had some of this when I bought an old Model 15 S&W K-frame a number of years ago. It had a light patina of rust all over it, and all I knew to do was use 0000 steel wool and oil. It did the job, but took that beautiful high-polish bluing that the old Smiths had off as well. Oh well, I had to take the rust off.

So if you haven't already done anything to it, please look up this stuff and try it. I think you will be amazed at how well it works!
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Old November 16th, 2009, 04:04 PM   #8
 
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shoot44,

Also available from Brownells and MidwayUSA. They will removed lead, too.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 06:48 PM   #9
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoot44 View Post
I'm real sorry that I only just read this post! I recently discovered a way to get the rust off of a blued gun that does NOT, repeat NOT, harm the finish!! NO LIE. If you haven't taken crocus cloth or steel wool to it yet, DON'T!

I just bought a used Marlin 1894 levergun. As I looked it over, I noticed several pretty small, but pronounced rust patches on the receiver. The guy selling it said: "I can take those off so you'll never see them without damaging the bluing; so don't sweat them." I figured, "yeah, and cows fly, too", but said, "Oh really, how?" He showed me a pad of what looked like a silvery 'chore boy', if you know what that is. I asked him how that would not damage the finish. He replied that it was not "Steel wool, but 'aluminum wool'". OOOOOkay. Still worrying, since by this time I had bought the gun, he said he'd take them off for me. Before I could object, he grabbed this 'chore boy', and some oily liquid, and proceeded to scrub the rust off. Then he handed it to me, and there was NO SIGN OF RUST, and NO DAMAGE AT ALL to the bluing!!! I could not believe my eyes.

At the next gun show, we looked for this stuff, but all we could find was a coarse steel wool substance. A month later, we did find some of it, and asked if it was indeed aluminum. No, he said, it is 'monel'! Aha; that is why it is silvery, and NOT aluminum.

It is labeled "Big 45 Frontier metal cleaner" (rust and dirt remover), and made for "Big 45 Frontier Gun Shop in Hill City, South Dakota.

www.BIG45metalcleaner.com

I know this is the stuff he used, since he told me it was made in the Dakotas somewhere. It's not cheap, ($5.00 a pad), but it works.

I only wish I had had some of this when I bought an old Model 15 S&W K-frame a number of years ago. It had a light patina of rust all over it, and all I knew to do was use 0000 steel wool and oil. It did the job, but took that beautiful high-polish bluing that the old Smiths had off as well. Oh well, I had to take the rust off.

So if you haven't already done anything to it, please look up this stuff and try it. I think you will be amazed at how well it works!
Looks just like a stain-less pot scrubber, to me. I stuffed a bunch of those in a Kerker I modified, on an old GPz 750, some years back.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 05:42 AM   #10
 
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Corrosion-X and very fine steel wool works well on Ruger barrels with rust. The Corrosion-X will bring the rust to the surface...you can see it bubbling. Then LIGHTLY buffing the area with some 0000 steel wool gets it off. Do it repeatedly and very lightly and the rust will disappear, leaving the bluing looking like new. It also works great on rusty hammers.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 06:22 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by texagun View Post
Corrosion-X and very fine steel wool works well on Ruger barrels with rust. The Corrosion-X will bring the rust to the surface...you can see it bubbling. Then LIGHTLY buffing the area with some 0000 steel wool gets it off. Do it repeatedly and very lightly and the rust will disappear, leaving the bluing looking like new. It also works great on rusty hammers.
Corrosion-X is one of many good products and this is sound advice for removing rust.

I know I have already stated this but I would still like to emphasize that the presence of rust indicates that the protective coating has been compromised. So, to add to what texagun has written, be very diligent with coating the outer surfaces with a fine coat of oil or silicone or your favorite preservative coating. Dry lubes are not usually as good at corrosion prevention.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 05:24 PM   #12
 
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Man, you guys are great. I thought this thread was dead. I'm constantly amazed at the knowledge people will share with others. Thanks to all for the sound advice.

Greg
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Old November 18th, 2009, 01:44 AM   #13
 
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Best way to remove finish is steel wool or a grit covered cloth....

A piece of copper or brass with oil works great at removing rust...


I used an old penny cut to the shape I needed before I found a brass screwdriver.Now I use both when needed to remove most rust.Lots of oil and pad the other side of the part so you can put a lot of force on it.Rust seams to basicaly be bubbles,you need to pop these bubbles to get the oil inside.A cut up old penny or piece of brass with some oil scraped back and forth will do this!The brass and/or copper will not hurt the finish!

If I have plans to reblue a gun but do not have a chemical on hand to remove the blueing then I use steel wool and oil,grit covered cloth and oil or wet/dry sandpaper and oil.All depends on how much damage needs to be fixed/hidden.If you want to try to save whats there for original finish then brass and copper are your friends and put some elbow greese into it!You may get goldish colored streaks but just rub with a clean cloth and your favorite oil and they go away.......


any oil from motor oil to tranny fluid to kroil to 3in1 to rem oil to whatever works just fine as long as you are using cooper and/or brass and wipe everything often....
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Old December 12th, 2009, 05:11 AM   #14
 
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Birchwood Casey makes a product called Barricade which is a penetrating oil that forms a protective film said to bond with metal. The instructions on the back of the can indicate that Barricade is excellent for removing surface rust from blued steel. You spray it on, allow it to penetrate then buff with extra fine steel wool. I've never tried it but I use Barricade to protect the metal parts of my guns and it is fantastic. It also will not harm synthetic surfaces which other oils or petroleum products can. GOOD LUCK!
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Old December 15th, 2009, 07:34 AM   #15
 
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Originally Posted by Don.b View Post
Looks just like a stain-less pot scrubber, to me. I stuffed a bunch of those in a Kerker I modified, on an old GPz 750, some years back.
Yeah, it sure does, but it is NOT stainless steel.... It is 'monel', which is a LOT 'softer' than steel, and therefore does not harm the bluing.
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