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Buck 124 "Frontiersman"

This is a discussion on Buck 124 "Frontiersman" within the Knives forums, part of the Firearm Forum category; Got a buddy that wants to get rid of one of these. It looks like a decent camp knife, not too big, not too small. ...


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Old September 14th, 2011, 09:22 AM   #1
 
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Buck 124 "Frontiersman"

Got a buddy that wants to get rid of one of these. It looks like a decent camp knife, not too big, not too small.

Any feedback?

Sorry, it's a "Frontiersman," not an "Outdoorsman."




Last edited by Begger; September 14th, 2011 at 06:05 PM.
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Old September 16th, 2011, 09:07 AM   #2
 
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Looks like a bigger version of the the 119. I would says its a great knife if its anything like the 119, your good to go.
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Old September 16th, 2011, 02:05 PM   #3
 
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I had one for years. In the Army and to India in the Peace Corps. Wonderful knife. Mine was stolen out of my car one day and I really regret its loss. I don't know that present day copies are as well made as the Bucks in the 60s.
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Old September 18th, 2011, 03:42 PM   #4
 
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This was an outgrowth of the Nemo diver's knife. If you're old enough, you may recall the ads for Nocona boots, one of which featured this knife. It was painted, but with exquisite detail. I wrote an article about the artist and that Buck for a knife magazine. He portrayed a cowboy stepping on a rattlesnake and cutting off the head with the knife.

Another ad in that series showed a gila monster about to be done in with a set of pliers or fencecutters.

The ads ran in, Playboy and other slick magazines for a couple or so years.

The Model 124 is discontinued. I seldom see one, but don't think most people consider them a collector's item. Some Buck collectors may, and the Nemo dive knife is scarce.

BTW, cans of smoke-flavored Spam once showed a Randall Model 3 knife. I also wrote an article about that, which appeared in, Knife World. The assistant photographer was a fan of good knives, and brought the Model 3 to the studio. Hormel (makers of Spam) sent W.D. Randall a bunch of empty cans with the knife on them. I wish they still used that can.

Some Bucks are still made in the USA, although some sheaths aren't. I think quality remains high, although easier to sharpen steels are employed in lieu of those from the 1960's. Those blades were very difficult to hone. I think the Nemo and the 124 arrived in the 1970's. Going by memory...

Last edited by Lone Star; September 18th, 2011 at 03:50 PM.
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Old September 18th, 2011, 04:21 PM   #5
 
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As a former BUCK dealer I can tell you they only do special models with the large 124 body; even the 120 is rare; most are the common 119's and smaller. That is worth a few dollars if in decent shape!!! A nice knife that can cut about anything that should be cut withh a knife if it is sharp!!
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Old September 18th, 2011, 04:24 PM   #6
 
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Still rely on my Old Timers open sheath done 100s of game and several bears,the bears really dulled the knife fast with all the fat to get through but sharpens up as new as the day made
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Old September 19th, 2011, 07:10 AM   #7
 
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The model 124 is probably the closest to what I would say is a "bowie" sized knife much along the Nemo line.
The Nemo was taken off the line when some corrosion issues came up being that the blade steel was not a true stainless.

I might be wrong on this but I think that BUCK now tries to do everything at their Post Falls,Idaho plant. There are probably some products that are made elsewhere though.

Years ago,BUCK stated that their steel was a "modified" 440 series.

You have a great knife there,a nice piece of BUCK history.

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Old September 19th, 2011, 04:05 PM   #8
 
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Buck has also used 420HC steel, but they had their heat treating done by Paul Bos and get/got better results from that steel and 425 than some would expect.
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Old September 20th, 2011, 05:21 AM   #9
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lone Star View Post
Some Bucks are still made in the USA, although some sheaths aren't. I think quality remains high, although easier to sharpen steels are employed in lieu of those from the 1960's. Those blades were very difficult to hone. I think the Nemo and the 124 arrived in the 1970's. Going by memory...
Most Bucks are made in the U.S.A.. Around 87%.
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Old September 20th, 2011, 05:47 AM   #10
 
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In India while in the Peace Corps, I used the old knife for everything from cutting open deceased chickens (to autopsy them in case they died from a preventable disease) trimming goats hooves, and cutting my goat meat at the table. The Indians thought it was a pretty nice knife, but one fellow liked to brag about Indian steel, with its centuries of manufacture. I had seen older knives and swords that were great pieces of craftsmanship and metal, but what most people bought in the marketplace was rather poorly made, many pocket knives were no more than pot metal.

So, this guy was bragging about his knife and I said the Buck knife was made much better made than what he had. He insisted I prove it, after much urging I said, "it will cut your knife."

Again after a lot of talk, he finally handed over the knife and trying not to damage it too much, I drew it across his blade at the very end of the edge where it widened. The Buck cut a visible notch in the his blade.

The guy insisted it must be a trick, that any knife would do the same to any other knife. I should add that we had all been drinking shrubi, a country-made liquer, which was the cause of all this speculation. He insisted I let him draw his blade across my knife's edge. I tried to argue him out of it, but he insisted all the more. I told him that whatever happened would be his responsibility and handed it over.

He triumphantly placed his knife edge against the edge of the Buck and forcefully drew it across, peeling off in a long curling strip the entire edge of his knife. The Buck, of course, was as it was before.
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Old September 20th, 2011, 05:55 AM   #11
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by advaitin View Post
In India while in the Peace Corps, I used the old knife for everything from cutting open deceased chickens (to autopsy them in case they died from a preventable disease) trimming goats hooves, and cutting my goat meat at the table. The Indians thought it was a pretty nice knife, but one fellow liked to brag about Indian steel, with its centuries of manufacture. I had seen older knives and swords that were great pieces of craftsmanship and metal, but what most people bought in the marketplace was rather poorly made, many pocket knives were no more than pot metal.

So, this guy was bragging about his knife and I said the Buck knife was made much better made than what he had. He insisted I prove it, after much urging I said, "it will cut your knife."

Again after a lot of talk, he finally handed over the knife and trying not to damage it too much, I drew it across his blade at the very end of the edge where it widened. The Buck cut a visible notch in the his blade.

The guy insisted it must be a trick, that any knife would do the same to any other knife. I should add that we had all been drinking shrubi, a country-made liquer, which was the cause of all this speculation. He insisted I let him draw his blade across my knife's edge. I tried to argue him out of it, but he insisted all the more. I told him that whatever happened would be his responsibility and handed it over.

He triumphantly placed his knife edge against the edge of the Buck and forcefully drew it across, peeling off in a long curling strip the entire edge of his knife. The Buck, of course, was as it was before.


I think the Buck family would love to see this. Please tell them. They might even use your account in an ad.
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Old October 15th, 2011, 07:58 AM   #12
 
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The only Buck knife I own is a Frontiersman that I bought back in the early 1980's. It is a great camp knife. I am not sure what the handle material is on mine, but I think it is Rosewood:



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Old October 15th, 2011, 11:23 AM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by Lone Star View Post
I think the Buck family would love to see this. Please tell them. They might even use your account in an ad.
I checked my knife case and I currently have a 124. My memory ain't what it used to be. I bought the 124 after my original knife was stolen. Looking at the Buck web site, I realize my knife from my Army days and through the Peace Corps in India was a 119, the Pathfinder.

That was the knife in the story.
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Old October 16th, 2011, 02:48 AM   #14
 
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The 119 Pathfinder was a different knife than the 119 they sell today. Todays 119 is a shrunken version of the 120 General, production of which was halted in 1987. The old 119 had a very different blade style.
I picked up a new 119 (mini-me) version to replace my disappeared 120. Not entirely satisfactory, and am now looking for a replacement 124.
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Old October 16th, 2011, 03:17 PM   #15
 
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Since at least the 1960's, the Model 105 has been the Pathfinder, the Model 119 the Special, and Model 120 was the General.

I had no idea that the General was discontinued so long ago! It was a good knife,but not too handy for skinning, and it probably ran afoul of blade length laws in some states. So would the Model 124.
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