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This is a discussion on Ruger Mk IV within the Gunsmithing forums, part of the Firearm Forum category; Greetings from the UK. I am a UK based Smith and wondered how easy it was to remove a barrel from a .22 Ruger Mk ...


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Old May 18th, 2017, 07:40 AM   #1
 
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Lightbulb Ruger Mk IV

Greetings from the UK.
I am a UK based Smith and wondered how easy it was to remove a barrel from a .22 Ruger Mk IV pistol. For the UK laws the barrel needs to be over 12" long and the overall length needs to be over 24". In the UK these are called LBP's - Long Barrelled Pistols.

Thanks in advance for your help.



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Old May 18th, 2017, 08:35 AM   #2
 
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Why? Is it because of the "hinged" barrel?
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Old May 18th, 2017, 09:10 AM   #3
 
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Welcome from Oklahoma.

I don't guess we understand your question. I was not aware of a 12 inch barrel Mark IV Ruger.
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Old May 18th, 2017, 11:30 AM   #4
 
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Sorry guys, I did not explain myself properly. I would need to unscrew the barrel from the 'receiver' and fit a 12" barrel that we would manufacture, to the receiver and then re-machine the pivot point. I needed to know if the barrel was just screwed into the 'receiver' or welded/ bonded in some way. I am used to fitting barrels to 686's which are only tightened in.

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Old May 18th, 2017, 11:49 AM   #5
 
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Unless you are talking about the Mark IV lite the barrel, and receiver are one piece. Not sure about the barrel on the lite, The outer housing is held on with a nut. If you can find a Mark 1 I do believe those barrels were screwed in.

OR you could just buy a Ruger Charger and weld on a two inch extension.


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Old May 18th, 2017, 12:28 PM   #6
 
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When I am at my PC I will upload an image clearly showing that the barrel of the Mark IV Pistol is screwed into the receiver.

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Old May 18th, 2017, 01:29 PM   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rude Fat Dog View Post
When I am at my PC I will upload an image clearly showing that the barrel of the Mark IV Pistol is screwed into the receiver.

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It is on the Mark 1, but schematics of latter generations do not show it as separate from the receiver.
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Old May 18th, 2017, 02:09 PM   #8
 
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He's right, even though it doesn't look like it in the schematics, it is threaded in. On my Mark IV Hunter you can see some of the threads once you separate receiver from grip frame and look at the underneath.

It appears the notch for the front joint is machined after the barrel is attached, as it cuts through the threads. I think they mean for it to be permanent.
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Old May 18th, 2017, 02:12 PM   #9
 
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Image of assembled MkIV barrel

As promised.
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File Type: jpg 20170518_230810.jpg (5.01 MB, 33 views)
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Old May 18th, 2017, 04:32 PM   #10
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Rude Fat Dog, The receiver and barrel are indeed separate pieces. At the factory, they use a special process to cool the barrel (contract) and heat the receiver (expand) then screw them together. When the two parts return to room temperature, it's almost like they are welded together. I have successfully separated the two using a similar technique. I have also ruined a perfectly good receiver trying to separate the two.

So .... unless you have liquid nitrogen available and all the safety equipment that goes along with it, chances are slim that you will get the barrel out without damaging the receiver beyond repair.
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Old May 18th, 2017, 06:45 PM   #11
 
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Were any bad words uttered when you ruined the perfectly good receiver?
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Old May 18th, 2017, 11:50 PM   #12
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iowegan View Post
Rude Fat Dog, The receiver and barrel are indeed separate pieces. At the factory, they use a special process to cool the barrel (contract) and heat the receiver (expand) then screw them together. When the two parts return to room temperature, it's almost like they are welded together. I have successfully separated the two using a similar technique. I have also ruined a perfectly good receiver trying to separate the two.

So .... unless you have liquid nitrogen available and all the safety equipment that goes along with it, chances are slim that you will get the barrel out without damaging the receiver beyond repair.
This is the exact information I required - thank you so much. I'll start searching 'online' for a metal 'shrinker'. Thanks again lowegan
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Old May 19th, 2017, 07:30 AM   #13
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ditto1958, Fortunately, the receiver was from an older gun with a worn out bore so I had very little invested in it. I probably did utter a string of foul language .... which is normal for me when I screw up.

It's pretty easy to salvage a barrel from a MK series receiver. All you have to do is hammer the outside threaded area of the receiver until it stretches enough to remove the barrel. The problem is .... now the receiver is trash and won't hold a barrel tight .... which was the case for the old MK I above.

One of my gunsmith friends uses the "hammer to stretch" technique then put the receiver in a lathe to turn the outside area where the threads are to get rid if the peen marks. Afterwards, they apply a liberal amount of Loc-Tite and screw a new barrel in. Of course with blued guns, the receiver has to be reblued before reassembly. I don't know how long this "Band-Aid" fix will work before the barrel loosens up. It might be worth a try on an older gun but I certainly wouldn't want to risk ruining a newer gun.
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Old May 19th, 2017, 07:45 AM   #14
 
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Seems to me there's a certain machining operation that occurs after the barrel is in place, a cut that matches some internal operation by matching both the barrel and the adjacent receiver material . . . tough to match up when replacing a barrel.

Or am I confused . . . again?

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Old May 19th, 2017, 08:50 AM   #15
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ale-8(1) View Post
Seems to me there's a certain machining operation that occurs after the barrel is in place, a cut that matches some internal operation by matching both the barrel and the adjacent receiver material . . . tough to match up when replacing a barrel.

Or am I confused . . . again?

Yes, indeed you are correct as this could be tricky. We usually convert Buckmark Rifles into Long Barrelled Pistols but they have stopped making them in Europe and this might happen in the US as well I feel.

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