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The One Man Responsible for WWII Victory...

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Old February 24th, 2017, 01:38 PM   #1
 
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The One Man Responsible for WWII Victory...

...In my opinion anyway.

In 1921 John Browning developed a weapon that would most likely be solely responsible for countless German and Japanese losses in WWII. He did not even have any idea what it would be when a large cartridge was developed and he stated that he "will see what I can build around it".

What he built around it was the M2 machine gun. Developed in 1921, it is still the preferred large caliber weapon with unmatched capabilities. The US Army even tried a few years back to develop a suitable weapon that was comparable, but fell way short and the Army decided to go back to their favorite weapon, the Ma Deuce.

This story is not so much about the gun itself but about its developer, John Browning. Any good weapon aficionado would know where the Model 1911 came from right? It too was John Browning's own design that is still to this day, the favored handgun of most owners who have a preference.

John Browning could be the one man who was responsible for the victory of the Allies in WWII. The 1911 and the M2 machine gun is still unmatched in their design and manufacture. No axis countries had anything close to the M2. Nothing.

The M2 was made in three different styles, water cooled, heavy barreled (83 lbs) and the air cooled shorter barreled version (apprx 62 lbs).

No words I can say can make the 1911 any more loved and popular than it already is.

How thankful are we as a free Nation to have John Browning on our side? If you would like to read an awesome story of the M2 and Browning, check out the new issue of American Rifleman.



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Old February 24th, 2017, 01:50 PM   #2
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I think a Canadian man named John Garand played a huge roll in the allied victory as did a Louisiana man named Andrew Higgins.
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Old February 24th, 2017, 01:57 PM   #3
 
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Originally Posted by terry_p View Post
I think a Canadian man named John Garand played a huge roll in the allied victory as did a Louisiana man named Andrew Higgins.
Of course, it was a team effort. Even Rosie the Riverter played a part in the victory.

Now what IS amazing that the 1911 and the M2 are still in use today. The Garand? Not so much as well as the Higgins gun. Both weapons contributed as much as Browning's developments but what is key, their technology still preferred today!

Thanks for the reply. The Higgins gun is a favorite of mine as well.
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Old February 24th, 2017, 01:58 PM   #4
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shady Slim View Post
...In my opinion anyway.

In 1921 John Browning developed a weapon that would most likely be solely responsible for countless German and Japanese losses in WWII. He did not even have any idea what it would be when a large cartridge was developed and he stated that he "will see what I can build around it".

What he built around it was the M2 machine gun. Developed in 1921, it is still the preferred large caliber weapon with unmatched capabilities. The US Army even tried a few years back to develop a suitable weapon that was comparable, but fell way short and the Army decided to go back to their favorite weapon, the Ma Deuce.

This story is not so much about the gun itself but about its developer, John Browning. Any good weapon aficionado would know where the Model 1911 came from right? It too was John Browning's own design that is still to this day, the favored handgun of most owners who have a preference.

John Browning could be the one man who was responsible for the victory of the Allies in WWII. The 1911 and the M2 machine gun is still unmatched in their design and manufacture. No axis countries had anything close to the M2. Nothing.

The M2 was made in three different styles, water cooled, heavy barreled (83 lbs) and the air cooled shorter barreled version (apprx 62 lbs).

No words I can say can make the 1911 any more loved and popular than it already is.

How thankful are we as a free Nation to have John Browning on our side? If you would like to read an awesome story of the M2 and Browning, check out the new issue of American Rifleman.
Don't you think that's reaching, at least just a little bit? There were too many contributors to our winning the war, and many of them are named on the crosses or Stars of David or other symbols of affiliation displayed in cemeteries in Europe and the US. There is NO WAY you can convince me that ONE MAN should get all the credit.
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Old February 24th, 2017, 02:03 PM   #5
 
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Originally Posted by ronzonie View Post
Don't you think that's reaching, at least just a little bit? There were too many contributors to our winning the war, and many of them are named on the crosses or Stars of David or other symbols of affiliation displayed in cemeteries in Europe and the US. There is NO WAY you can convince me that ONE MAN should get all the credit.
Not trying to convince anyone of anything other than two weapons developed in the early part of last century is STILL preferred today. Are there any other weapons you can think of that are still used by the US Army in such numbers or sold to handgunners as the 1911 is.

Sorry if you got the wrong idea. No one man should get all the credit. It was a team effort and we both know that. Please do not be so facetious. This thread is in GUN STORIES.
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Old February 24th, 2017, 02:07 PM   #6
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Without the Higgins boat guns would not have come close to the battle.

Quote:
The Higgins Boat

“Andrew Higgins is the man who won the war for us.”
-President Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1964 interview


The President went on to explain: “If Higgins had not designed and built those LCVPs (Landing Craft, Vehicle and Personnel), we never could have landed over an open beach. The whole strategy of the war would have been different.” And as Colonel Joseph H. Alexander, USMC (Ret) said, “The Higgins boats broke the gridlock on the ship-to-shore movement. It is impossible to overstate the tactical advantages this craft gave U.S. amphibious commanders in World War II.”

Clearly, the half-wood half-steel “smallboat” meant a lot to the War. These assault or LCVP boats would land troops and material on invasion beachheads. Their designer, Andrew Higgins, a fire-tempered Irishman who drank whiskey like a fish, was originally building oil-prospecting wooden boats in Louisiana. Once the war broke out, he was positive there would be a need among the U.S. Navy for thousands of small boats—and was also sure that steel would be in short supply. In an common moment of eccentricity, Higgins bought the entire 1939 crop of mahogany from the Philippines and stored it on his own.
Higgins’ expectations were right, and as the war progressed he applied for a position in Naval design. Insisting that the Navy “doesn’t know one damn thing about small boats,” Higgins struggled for years to convince them of the need for small wooden boats. Finally he signed the contract to develop his LCVP.
Employing more than 30,000 for an integrated workforce in New Orleans (pictured at left[1]). Higgins employed blacks and women among them, which was uncommon practice at the time. This force eagerly began mass-producing the “Higgins boats,” which were 36’3” in length and had a beam of 10’10”. Their displacement when unloaded was 18,000 lbs., and they could maintain a speed of 9 knots. They were defended by 2 .30 caliber machine guns, and could carry 36 combat-equipped infantrymen or 8,000 pounds of cargo. For a detailed picture of a Higgins boat’s anatomy, see the image below. Along with the help of other American factories, Higgins produced 23,398 LCVPs during the War.
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Old February 24th, 2017, 02:11 PM   #7
 
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Originally Posted by Shady Slim View Post
Of course, it was a team effort. Even Rosie the Riverter played a part in the victory.

Now what IS amazing that the 1911 and the M2 are still in use today. The Garand? Not so much as well as the Higgins gun. Both weapons contributed as much as Browning's developments but what is key, their technology still preferred today!

Thanks for the reply. The Higgins gun is a favorite of mine as well.
Higgins gun? No, Andrew Higgins, in Louisiana, was the founder and owner of Higgins Industries, the manufacturer of many small landing craft, PT boats, and other various military implements. Higgins was originally from Nebraska.
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Old February 24th, 2017, 02:15 PM   #8
 
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Originally Posted by Shady Slim View Post
Not trying to convince anyone of anything other than two weapons developed in the early part of last century is STILL preferred today. Are there any other weapons you can think of that are still used by the US Army in such numbers or sold to handgunners as the 1911 is.

Sorry if you got the wrong idea. No one man should get all the credit. It was a team effort and we both know that. Please do not be so facetious. This thread is in GUN STORIES.
Maybe the title "The One Man Responsible for WWII Victory..." that you placed on the thread was the problem.
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Old February 24th, 2017, 02:36 PM   #9
 
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Maybe the title "The One Man Responsible for WWII Victory..." that you placed on the thread was the problem.
Or the "In my opinion anyway" that follows it. Geezus.
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Old February 24th, 2017, 03:38 PM   #10
 
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The article in question, "STATE OF PERFECTION" The Gun That Won the War, does indeed pretty much claim the M2 was the weapon mostly responsible for the Allies' victory in WWII.

Author Barrett Tillman pours it on quite thickly, only giving passing credit to other weapons including the 1911. I, too, thought it was just a bit much considering that it was America's immense manufacturing capabilities that essentially overwhelmed the Third Reich, not to mention considerable input from the rest of the Allies.

Well-done article, albeit overly enthusiastic.
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Old February 25th, 2017, 03:25 AM   #11
 
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This is off track but I remember reading about Henry Kaiser who was responsible for the mass production of the Liberty Ships. The were used by the merchant marine . He devoleped the assembly line production of these massive ships. They normally took about six months to build but they got it down to two weeks. They even built one in four days.
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Old February 25th, 2017, 04:31 AM   #12
 
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The M2 .50 caliber was a pretty lethal machine gun. To this day a better machine gun replacement still has NOT been found.
Definitely one of the most important weapons of several wars.
My grandfather was in 2nd armored in a tank from 1942 to 1946. So he seen ALOT of combat.

He said when they made an armored break through, they would "coil up" for the night in enemy territory with all guns pointed outward. Kinda like circling the wagons. They would do this while they waited for the infantry to catch up and guard the flanks. The Germans were notorious for counter attacking an armored breakthrough, especially at night.

Their Commanding General in Europe, Courtney Hodges, was a strong believer in combined arms. He sent the Sheman tanks in with, the M7 105mm self propelled guns, and also the half track anti air craft guns who had QUAD FIFTYS, specifically for mobile support against german infantry counter attack.

Right after dark, the QUAD FIFTYS would rip nice long burst into suspected enemy positions. The QUAD FIFTYS would give almost an appearance of a constant red stream of tracers at night. Since the enemy ALREADY knew right where they were at, it didnt matter about giving their positions away. What did matter was the Germans were scared to death of the fifty caliber machine guns and would not attack at night if they knew the quad fiftys were present. .
You dont get lightly wounded by a fifty cal. Get Hit in the arm, blow your arm off. Hit in the leg,, blow your leg off. Hit in the guts, blow you in half. The were really scared to attack when the quad fiftys were known to be present in the armored coil.
So our guys were sure to let them know at night,,
" HEY kraut boys,, BAPP BAPPP BAPP BAP,, Look what we got,,BAPP BAPP BAPP BAP,,,, , WANT SOME ? ".
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Old February 25th, 2017, 05:04 AM   #13
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Since we're focusing on the weapons used by US forces to win WWII, I think the top honors have to go to Robert Oppenheimer. His development of the atomic bomb arguably ended the war - at least the war against Japan.

The US was in a race to get the a-bomb before Germany and without Oppenheimer's nearly round-the-clock work on the project, the Nazi's might have gotten there first. And history might have been very different had we gotten the bomb in time to use it against Germany.

While we almost certainly would have won the war against Japan without the bomb, we would have probably lost many tens of thousands soldiers in a mainland invasion of the island nation.

With that said, I'd still rather have a Browning machine gun in my safe than an a-bomb. (Don't think there's room in there for one anyway.)
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Old February 25th, 2017, 06:07 AM   #14
 
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the m2 was and is a great weapon but as mentioned many people and events played a part in our winning of ww2.
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