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Not for the faint of heart . . . ;)

This is a discussion on Not for the faint of heart . . . ;) within the Gun Stories forums, part of the Firearm Forum category; Wasn’t sure where to post this: Projects? Well, it was done many years ago, and more of a hack than a project. (I was young ...


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Old December 25th, 2016, 12:38 PM   #1
 
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Not for the faint of heart . . . ;)

Wasn’t sure where to post this:
Projects? Well, it was done many years ago, and more of a hack than a project. (I was young then . . .)
Gunsmithing? Well, again, considering the tools I had available at the time, definitely not fine gunsmithing, more of a hack. (I was young then . . .)
There is a story around this, so guess here in Gun Stories would be as good as any.

Back in the ‘80’s, when I was in my 20’s, Dad found this old gun in the field. He had run over it with the disc, breaking the pot metal frame in two. It's a Hy-Hunter "Frontier Six-Shooter Model", Hollywood, CA, made in West Germany, .22 lr.
Being a bit of a tinkerer, I decided to see if I could make a frame for it. Can’t work with pot metal, so the fix has to be steel. My welder was a 220V stick welder, so no finesse welding like I can do now with my wire-feed. Grinder? Nope, just files, and maybe a cheapo grinding wheel on my drill. I had plenty of time but no money, so after more hours than I care to remember, it was “done”.
I was hesitant to post this, as I wasn’t sure of the legality of this work. But then I discovered that the serial number is on the barrel, so the gun is still legal.

Here it is, with detail pix to take you through the process:




Here you can see the groove in the grip that was cut when the disc ran over it:


When I made the frame, I did not have a threader to match the fine threads on the barrel. So I cut new threads on the barrel with my Montgomery Ward tap & die set. And we all know how Straight and True those kind of threads can be! I discovered that as I watched the barrel wobble its way into the frame, in which I had welded a nut. But, when it finally hit the shoulder, it was (amazingly enough!!) nice & straight with the frame. BUT, “amazingly” ain’t aways “perfect” as I found out. I had an old Daisy CO2 pistol that was unfixable. It had an adjustable rear sight on it. Took it off, cut the front sight off the barrel, and screwed it onto the .22 barrel. Same with the rear sight.




The bottom of the frame was easy, the front, with cutouts for the ejector rod & cylinder pin was not so easy to get built up. Remember, stick welder (with probably 3/32 rod!) and no Dremel tool to clean it up afterwards. The break in the pot metal side behind the second screw, and the way the steel frame is attached to what is left of the pot metal frame allows the front half to wiggle a bit.



Then on to the firing mechanism. The original was actually an inertia firing pin in the frame. But the frame was broken at that exact spot. So, I welded up the hammer with a fixed firing pin, which resulted in having to cut a groove into the back of the frame. Again, finesse was not possible, so it left a large enough opening that when the shell fires, it bulges back into the opening, creating a bit of a drag when the cylinder turns. Oh, and the loading gate is not fancy, merely functional.


So, does it work? Well, yes, as hinted in the last paragraph. It rotates the cylinder as it should (well, there is one chamber that needs an assist), the firing pin is designed right, and it fires! I have shot a few .22 LR standard velocity in it (with, rightly so, some amount of fear & trepidation!), but it was primarily used in the quonset shed on the farm with birdshot for sparrows.
The last few years it has been in my gun safe as a curiosity, have not fired it in a long time, and probably won't again!







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Old December 25th, 2016, 05:09 PM   #2
 
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looks good.
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Old December 25th, 2016, 05:40 PM   #3
 
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Great story, thanks for sharing. It exemplifies the ingenuity of us farm lads and triggers many memories of my past.
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